Colt Forum banner

21 - 27 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
This a slightly later model 1878 New Frontier DA Colt that replaced the fragile first series of 1877. These were produced through 1907. I have had one for about 40 years. It's a 44-40 and is my favorite "using" pistol.
Didn't realize they had improved the action on this model. That's interesting. I do like the styling of the gun, and the one shown is a beauty. Colt, just my opinion, has made a couple of missteps along the way, but generally you can count on them. I like both my Colts and Smiths, both excellent pistols. Of course the good old SAA remains a sentimental favorite. Like a friend of mine said when someone asked him how many guns he really wanted, he said, speaking for many of us, "One of each."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Very sleek look without the bolt cuts on the cylinder. Excuse my ignorance, but what makes that circular mark on the left side of the frame?
The big screw is a LEFT handed screw and most don't know that and they Bugger up the screw heads. It loosens the disc and it locks in with a cut and tab when loose. Access to the inside of the gun. Very Strong and robust gun compared to the more fragile Colt 1877's in .32 Colt (Rainmaker)...38 long Colt (Lightning)....41 Colt (Thunderer). They are sometimes called the Philippine models with the bigger trigger guard and longer trigger. Some mistakenly call them the Alaskan models to be shot with gloved hands, but not so. Hope this helps you. Big Jake # 1001 SASS Life.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
I am quite impressed by the condition, but even more so by the custom-level metal work, both in fitting and polishing. Look at that hammer fit into the frame! Would cost 3K+ for that today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I am quite impressed by the condition, but even more so by the custom-level metal work, both in fitting and polishing. Look at that hammer fit into the frame! Would cost 3K+ for that today.
I noticed exactly the same thing. A perfect fit, and all done by skilled hands.
The big screw is a LEFT handed screw and most don't know that and they Bugger up the screw heads. It loosens the disc and it locks in with a cut and tab when loose. Access to the inside of the gun. Very Strong and robust gun compared to the more fragile Colt 1877's in .32 Colt (Rainmaker)...38 long Colt (Lightning)....41 Colt (Thunderer). They are sometimes called the Philippine models with the bigger trigger guard and longer trigger. Some mistakenly call them the Alaskan models to be shot with gloved hands, but not so. Hope this helps you. Big Jake # 1001 SASS Life.
Jack, I gather that .38 is called the Philippine model because of the pistol's poor showing against a determined enemy during the insurrection. I recall they had to reissue the SAA in .45 Long Colt to gain enough stopping power.
Apparently the sturdier model was the next one down the pike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
705221
Paulem, Big JAKE here, I believe the .38 cal Long Colt you talk about is from the U,S. Army 1892, 1899 model that was the current sidearm using the 130 grain bullet @ 800 fps and wouldn't Stop the Finaticial Moros in the Philippines. They wanted a .45 cal and called up the old SAA. The 1878 wasn't that gun and was chambered in ,45 Colt, .44-40 WCF and .38-40 WCF and not the smaller cartridge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
View attachment 705221 Paulem, Big JAKE here, I believe the .38 cal Long Colt you talk about is from the U,S. Army 1892, 1899 model that was the current sidearm using the 130 grain bullet @ 800 fps and wouldn't Stop the Finaticial Moros in the Philippines. They wanted a .45 cal and called up the old SAA. The 1878 wasn't that gun and was chambered in ,45 Colt, .44-40 WCF and .38-40 WCF and not the smaller cartridge.
My memory ain't what it used to be, so thanks for that info. I think I recall the motto "Civilize 'um with a Krag" was from that campaign. Wiry little devils, them Moros.
 
21 - 27 of 27 Posts
Top