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I would like to start searching for a 1911 Colt from the 20's or 30's.
Searches bring up the wrong items and years. Are there key words I could be using.
Note: I am not trying to get around the classified 15 post requirements and will not respond to offers.
thx
jon
 

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A simple Google search for "Colt 1911 1920" found over 2.5 million hits.........

Are you searching for anything in particular?

Note: Why the comment about getting around the classified rule?
 

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In 1923 Ordnance ordered 10,000 "Improved Model 1911" pistols which were delivered in 1924. In 1926 Ordnance decided the model designation would be Model 1911A1, so this in effect put the last Model 1911 pistols being manufactured in early 1919. After the 1924 order of 10,000 pistols, no more were ordered until 1937.

If you are searching for a Government Model, which was the commercial version of the military pistol, try using that instead of the 1911 designation.
 

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This again illustrates another downside of using "1911" to refer to commercial Government Model pistols. When one wants to search for a true military Model of 1911, one has to wade through hundreds of misidentified commercial models. As JohnnyP points out, there are no Model of 1911 pistols made after 1919, but the OP may not have realized that when mentioning the 1920s and 1930s.

Unless, of course, the OP actually is seeking a commercial Government Model pistol and not a military Model of 1911! :eek:
 

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Hi jon, welcome to the Colt Forum. As JohnnyP and the Judge point out, correct terminology is key. If looking at our classified section, generally you'll note that the persons selling will distinguish the particular model. On auctions such as Gunbroker, unfortunately the seller will invariably use incorrect "1911" terminology to describe all sorts of Colt semi-autos as 1911's. Just be mindful of the terminology. After your 15 posts you may post a classified for the exact 1920's or 1930's pistol you seek. Nice to have you here.
 

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Not at all that any of those commercial models aren't absolutely exquisite Colt automatic pistols! Some people want a M1911, and others don't care if USGOV was on the PO.
 

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And let's not even get into cartridge terminology for those "1911s" :rolleyes:

"Hey, I just bought a .45 Colt. What can you tell me about it?"

"Got any reloading data for my .45 Colt?"


John Gross
 

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Don't know about the early Colt historical letters, but the recent letters on the Government Model or 1911/1911A1 pistols the caliber is listed as .45/c. On the New Service pistol if the caliber is .45 Colt, it too is listed as ​.45/c.
 

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I think the ".45/c" is meant to refer to ".45 caliber," not exactly specific when there are the .45 Colt, .45ACP and .45AR (Auto-Rim), etc., to name a few common Colt .45 caliber cartridges.
 

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.45 Auto Rim was a commercial answer to revolvers originally chambered in .45 ACP rather than a stand alone caliber.

The same assumption does not carry over into the .38 caliber pistols. For one, the Super .38 caliber is listed as .38 Super rather than .38/c.
 
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