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Colt walker

3329 Views 58 Replies 23 Participants Last post by  ironrider
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Well trying to find out if it’s authentic or not seems to have all the correct markings and the serial number comes back to it correctly but that can be faked. Thoughts ?
Tool Sleeve Wood Font Metal

Hand Automotive tire Bumper Gesture Wood

Tin Font Rectangle Gas Cylinder

Light Font Rectangle Gas Cylinder

Rectangle Font Gas Tints and shades Fixture

Gas Font Cylinder Tin Metal
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Did you find it in the wall of the house from 1744? Seems people are finding all the time guns, knives and swords in early houses in my area. Only, they are almost always fake. I think they make the claim, because with an “attic find,” people would wonder why no one had gone into the attic for 150 years or more.
Did you find it in the wall of the house from 1744? Seems people are finding all the time guns, knives and swords in early houses in my area. Only, they are almost always fake. I think they make the claim, because with an “attic find,” people would wonder why no one had gone into the attic for 150 years or more.
hello; it happened, some attics had "plunder rooms" barely able to be enteed like fibber mcgee's closet. widening a door to move out a huge china cabinet my brother found an aaluminum handled survival knife my father had made during wwll experimental i think, hidden in the wall next to the door frame on a cotton cord tied to a nail. my mother remembered his giving the knife to my grandfather.
regards, bro
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hello; it happened, some attics had "plunder rooms" barely able to be enteedr like fibber mcgee's closet. widening a door to move out a huge china cabinet my brother found an aaluminum handled survival knife my father had made during wwll experimental i think, hidden in the wall next to the door frame on a cotton cord tied to a nail.
regards, bro
To be sure, former Confederates did hide their weapons from Carpet Baggers during the occupancy of Southern states by the North. However, when told a weapon was found in a wall of a house, there should be details on the finding. Who, What, Why and Where. In the end, any such claim should immediately be suspect and require closer scrutiny of the claim and weapon.
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To be sure, former Confederates did hide their weapons from Carpet Baggers during the occupancy of Southern states by the North. However, when told a weapon was found in a wall of a house, there should be details on the finding. Who, What, Why and Where. In the end, any such claim should immediately be suspect and require closer scrutiny of the claim and weapon.
hello; same during sixties and seventies when first serious takeover (attempt) ocurreed, there is nothing new under the sun.
regards, bro
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I think it could be a Colt 2nd Generation Walker or an Armi San Marco Walker with a Colt barrel address and Colt's Patent cylinder markings. I tend to think 2nd Gen Colt because it appears to have fatter grips, most ASM's had slender grips. Pics of the serial number font on the bottom of the frame might help. A 2nd Gen Colt should also have the serial number on the side of the cylinder, whereas an ASM with Colt markings would have a blank spot at the same location.
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Here is my Italian Walker.

Air gun Trigger Gun accessory Gun barrel Composite material
Gun accessory Cylinder Composite material Trigger Auto part
Wood Automotive exterior Tints and shades Eyewear Metal
Cylinder Wood Metal Air gun Gas
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Looks like OP has bailed since post #30. Seems like another "original Walker found" thread where the OP fades as knowledge is revealed. Teddy, stay around to learn and share.
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Just picked up this CVA walker by sheer luck and perfect timing two nights ago. It came with over 800 Hornady .454 balls, over 1k Remington #11 caps, about 500 lubed wads, 2lbs of Triple 7 (though I prefer real black), a spare cylinder and oddly enough a new unused 1860 cylinder. I’ve yet to find out if that cylinder (which has Italian proofs) will fit either my ASP or Pietta 1860’s but I don’t really need a new cylinder for either. Anyhow… all in for $300 I think I did well. Old guy liquidating his stuff and I just happened to be at the right place at the right time.
The gun was out of time but I fixed that in short order while completely disassembling it. Gap seems ok though I can’t find my gauge anywhere. There was tons of grime inside. Doubt it has ever been fully torn apart since factory (1987). Looking forward to shooting it in about 2 hours from now. Planning to go 50 grains GOEX and not push it past that.
Pic with my ASP for size comparison. Holy crap the Walker is big huh? When I bought this Tuesday night it was the first time I’ve ever seen one in person. I’d been keeping my eye out for several years for an affordable copy and here it is.
Air gun Revolver Line Trigger Gun barrel
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For that amount of money you really did well. Enjoy your new acquisition (y) ;)
For all the goodies along with the gun...that's a pretty darned good deal! (y) (y)
Enjoy shooting it!!
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Regarding Colt percussion pistols,a Colt gun collector told me this years ago- - The screws on Italian (European) Colt repos are metric. US manufactured Colt screws are not.
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Well it’s a hoot to shoot! Just two issues, one of which I expected (the lever dropping after each shot).
After 12 rounds the cylinder was seized up tight. I made sure to grease the arbor well and it still locked up tight way prematurely. Is this common in these?
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Well it’s a hoot to shoot! Just two issues, one of which I expected (the lever dropping after each shot).
After 12 rounds the cylinder was seized up tight. I made sure to grease the arbor well and it still locked up tight way prematurely. Is this common in these?
My Navy Arms Italian 1851 Navy would do the same, I suspect the tolerances are too tight on the newer ones but would be surprised if a new original would go 24 rounds without getting fouled bad enough to “lock up”.
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Well it’s a hoot to shoot! Just two issues, one of which I expected (the lever dropping after each shot).
After 12 rounds the cylinder was seized up tight. I made sure to grease the arbor well and it still locked up tight way prematurely. Is this common in these?
Black powder revolvers tend to bind up after about 12 rounds. I used 2 Dragoons for a while in cowboy matches and found that lubing the arbor pin with Breakfree got me about twice as many shots before I had to tear it down and clean it. Remington 1858's are a little better. I was using true black powder so I'm not sure how the substitutes work out.
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Black powder revolvers tend to bind up after about 12 rounds. I used 2 Dragoons for a while in cowboy matches and found that lubing the arbor pin with Breakfree got me about twice as many shots before I had to tear it down and clean it. Remington 1858's are a little better. I was using true black powder so I'm not sure how the substitutes work out.
None of my other cap n ball guns seize up that quickly as long as I do my part with lubing the arbor. I’ve put 30+ rounds through my 1860’s in one outing without the cylinder binding so bad I couldn’t turn it. I wonder if it’s the sheer volume of soot and pressure coming out of the Walker that binds up the cylinder to arbor junction. I think next time I may try CLP instead of grease.
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None of my other cap n ball guns seize up that quickly as long as I do my part with lubing the arbor. I’ve put 30+ rounds through my 1860’s in one outing without the cylinder binding so bad I couldn’t turn it. I wonder if it’s the sheer volume of soot and pressure coming out of the Walker that binds up the cylinder to arbor junction. I think next time I may try CLP instead of grease.
Grease is the historic lubrication but I believe you're right about the volume of crud on a Walker (or Dragoon). The grease tends to collect it. Breakfree CLP works well.
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I have had the same problem on every replica percussion I shot (1849s, 1851s, 1860, 1861, and a Walker)...after about 1 or 2 cylinders shot through it they bound up tight. I have come up with a solution that works for me. First of all, I use Pyrodex. Same boom, same smoke, same loading techniques, same cleaning techniques, but more shooting! Also the grease matters. After a LOT pf experimentation I have settled on Tetra Lube grease on the arbor as being the grease that allowed the most shooting. Now I get 30 to 36 shots (6 cylinders) before things lock up. If you insist on using black I would at least try the tetra-lube. I have no idea how that grease works with BP because I pretty much gave up on black about a decade ago (although I tried it again yesterday in an 1876 Winchester clone. Group sizes were almost 3X what they were with pyrodex).
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If you'll use Mobil1 grease and fix the short arbor so that you can maintain a .002" - .003" endshake you can shoot all day without binding a cylinder.
That'd be around 160 / 180 shots ? That's what the cowboy shooters do on a fairly regular basis . . .
Mike
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Now if I was just strong enough to hold up a couple of those horse pistols for a 10 stage match I'll be good to go.
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