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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought that our group here would be interested in seeing this original COLT'S PATENT REPEATING PISTOLS DIRECTIONS FOR CLEANING paper. It has to be pre 1860 and for the Dragoon (just shown as Army Pistol, not "New" or "Improved" that was the designation for the Model 1860 Army) the Belt Pistol, which would be the Model 1851 Navy and the Pocket Model, including Baby Dragoon, designated as Pocket Pistol. It tells of how to disassemble the revolver, clean it and put it back together. It states elementary things like making sure the ball is seated below the edge of the cylinder so that the cylinder can rotate.

This is printed on very thin paper and would have been supplied with the Colt revolvers of the day. Survival must be minuscule as it is so fragile and I have never heard or seen another, but this doesn't mean others can't exist. I think that it is really interesting.

 

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I thought that our group here would be interested in seeing this original COLT'S PATENT REPEATING PISTOLS DIRECTIONS FOR CLEANING paper. It has to be pre 1860 and for the Dragoon (just shown as Army Pistol, not "New" or "Improved" that was the designation for the Model 1860 Army) the Belt Pistol, which would be the Model 1851 Navy and the Pocket Model, including Baby Dragoon, designated as Pocket Pistol. It tells of how to disassemble the revolver, clean it and put it back together. It states elementary things like making sure the ball is seated below the edge of the cylinder so that the cylinder can rotate.

This is printed on very thin paper and would have been supplied with the Colt revolvers of the day. Survival must be minuscule as it is so fragile and I have never heard or seen another, but this doesn't mean others can't exist. I think that it is really interesting.

Here are the instructions for loading the Thuer revolvers..............Jim
View attachment 463546
 

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Thanks for posting, I've seen them quite often in cased guns, inside of the lid, but never as a loose sheet.
Question: if the pistol in question wasn't cased, how would it have been packaged/shipped? And did they always come with other accesiores aswell, like a nipple wrench, bullet mold or powder flask (when they weren't cased)

I like it how the 'manual' is only one sheet, covers all you need to know, and doesn't have 50 warnings on each page.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think that retailers had these to hand to customers when they bought the revolver along with the other necessary tools. The instructions that we see pasted to the inside lids are different, have illustrations and are of thicker paper. This one seems to indicate that it was an inexpensive throw away instruction to go with the sale.
 

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Question: if the pistol in question wasn't cased, how would it have been packaged/shipped? And did they always come with other accesiores aswell, like a nipple wrench, bullet mold or powder flask (when they weren't cased)
From an 1860 Colt factory wholesale price list:
Colt 1860 partial price list for Coltforum.jpg
Powder flasks are priced separately, according to size.
 

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A little bit of history on Thuer Conversions I found on Wikipedia, Colt's Metallic Cartridge Revolver


Colt 1851 Navy conversions
The first metallic cartridge revolver made by Colt’s was the Thuer-Conversion Model Revolver, a design that would not require a cylinder with cylindrical chambers to not infringe on the Rollin White patent. A small number (about 1000-1500) of Model 1851 Navy revolvers was converted, using front-loaded, slightly tapered cartridges to fit the chambers of the cylinder reamed to a slight taper.
After the expiration of the Rollin White Patent (Apr. 3, 1869), Colt 1851 (and 1861 Navy) Revolvers were converted or newly made to fire .38 rim fire or centre fire cartridges, the Colt Model 1851 Richards- Mason Conversion by the Colt factory.
Kind regards, ALSS.
 

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A little bit of history on Thuer Conversions I found on Wikipedia, Colt's Metallic Cartridge Revolver


Colt 1851 Navy conversions
The first metallic cartridge revolver made by Colt’s was the Thuer-Conversion Model Revolver, a design that would not require a cylinder with cylindrical chambers to not infringe on the Rollin White patent. A small number (about 1000-1500) of Model 1851 Navy revolvers was converted, using front-loaded, slightly tapered cartridges to fit the chambers of the cylinder reamed to a slight taper.
After the expiration of the Rollin White Patent (Apr. 3, 1869), Colt 1851 (and 1861 Navy) Revolvers were converted or newly made to fire .38 rim fire or centre fire cartridges, the Colt Model 1851 Richards- Mason Conversion by the Colt factory.
Kind regards, ALSS.
ALSS'....Here is a 51 Thuer and Richard Mason..........
View attachment 465001 View attachment 465009
 
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