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My grandfather left behind some firearms when he died and my Uncle gave them to my Brother and I over the last few years. My Grandfather worked for Colt and The story we were told was that one of the rifles was a prototype Coltsman chambered in 300 H&H magnum. Its a sweet rifle but I know absolutely nothing about them. I was just reading they were made by Sako. I'm not doubting the prototype story that goes with the gun, but I am wondering if there is any production info out there to read. Any ideas where I might begin?

Thanks!
Bob
 

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I have a Coltsman in .300 H&H Magnum but it's made on an FN action. Depending on when it was made, it could be on the FN or a Sako action. The caliber markings can be confusing if you're not careful. Mine is marked ".300 Magnum" which could be confused with the .300 Winchester Magnum which didn't come about until the early 1960s after the Coltsman rifles were discontinued. I also have a Coltsman and Coltsman Deluxe on the Sako action as well as a Colt 57 on the FN action.

The information I've read was that the actions were obtained from FN or Sako and the rifles were actually not assembled by Colt but by Jefferson Arms under Colt contract.

The .300 H&H was sometimes referred to as the "Super .30". Mine shoots very well and doesn't impart much more recoil than a .30-06.

Here's mine with a Coltmaster 4x scope...

P1100335.JPG

P1100338.JPG
 

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A gun shop in the Louisville area has one of these and it appears to be a mauser action. These would have been late 50's to early sixties produced firearms. The mauser action guns were made state side and the sako guns, which came a little later where of course imported. It is stamped 300 magnum as the 300 Winchester was yet to come out. This shop has had the gun for at least 15 years. About 7 years ago, when I ask to look at it at about $550, the owner said he needed to raise the price of the gun. He did and the last I looked it was at $700. Funny, if something doesn't move, doesn't one reduce the price?
 

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He may not really want to sell the rifle...except for stupid money. I've seen far too many vendors (not just guns) put stuff out at crazy prices. I get the idea of having some bargaining room in your asking price but sometimes I really don't think they intend to sell items like that...it's just window dressing to bring you to their store or tables so they can sell you something else they really want to get rid of.
 
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Here are a few pics. I've searched the internet and can't find squat on the Coltsman. If anyone can provide any info I would appreciate it. Happy Thanksgiving!
 

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The rifle you're showing is built on the FN action rather than the Sako. I have at least one book with some information but I'm not home at the moment. I'll get some more information posted tomorrow.
 

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OK...after looking in Wilson's "The Book of Colt Firearms" I find I was incorrect about a few things I said in my first post. The rifles made by Jefferson Manufacturing Company were the "Colt 57" series of rifles. The "Coltsman" line come out a year later and were built originally on the FN action with a Sako designed trigger group and were produced under contract by Kodiak which Jefferson Manufacturing had become. The "Coltsman" line of rifles was more diverse than the previous "Colt 57" line was.

At some point a change was made to the Sako L-57 action, still being assembled by Kodiak with the custom line being wholly assembled by Sako. There was a history of late deliveries by Sako and Kodiak's ownership changed hands and they went bankrupt and the entire line of Colt centerfire long guns ended until the Colt/Sauer (outside of the M16 and AR-15). The .300 H&H Magnum versions of the "Coltsman" rifles were only on the FN action, not the Sako.

I have examples of both...FN and Sako...and they're fine rifles. They're easily the equal of any other commercial rifle available at the time. They're rarely seen for sale...if you do run across one for sale (not at stupid money), I would suggest you buy it even if it's not a caliber you care for. Maybe 15,000 "Colt 57" and "Coltsman" rifles were built...not a number that one would consider rare, but rarely are they available.
 

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My grandfather left behind some firearms when he died and my Uncle gave them to my Brother and I over the last few years. My Grandfather worked for Colt and The story we were told was that one of the rifles was a prototype Coltsman chambered in 300 H&H magnum. Its a sweet rifle but I know absolutely nothing about them. I was just reading they were made by Sako. I'm not doubting the prototype story that goes with the gun, but I am wondering if there is any production info out there to read. Any ideas where I might begin?

Thanks!
Bob
OK...after looking in Wilson's "The Book of Colt Firearms" I find I was incorrect about a few things I said in my first post. The rifles made by Jefferson Manufacturing Company were the "Colt 57" series of rifles. The "Coltsman" line come out a year later and were built originally on the FN action with a Sako designed trigger group and were produced under contract by Kodiak which Jefferson Manufacturing had become. The "Coltsman" line of rifles was more diverse than the previous "Colt 57" line was.

At some point a change was made to the Sako L-57 action, still being assembled by Kodiak with the custom line being wholly assembled by Sako. There was a history of late deliveries by Sako and Kodiak's ownership changed hands and they went bankrupt and the entire line of Colt centerfire long guns ended until the Colt/Sauer (outside of the M16 and AR-15). The .300 H&H Magnum versions of the "Coltsman" rifles were only on the FN action, not the Sako.

I have examples of both...FN and Sako...and they're fine rifles. They're easily the equal of any other commercial rifle available at the time. They're rarely seen for sale...if you do run across one for sale (not at stupid money), I would suggest you buy it even if it's not a caliber you care for. Maybe 15,000 "Colt 57" and "Coltsman" rifles were built...not a number that one would consider rare, but rarely are they available.
hello can anyone see this. First time
 

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Well I guess i have a question bout a colt long gun its a colt coltsman mag 300
i was hooopeing for some idea of just what it may be worth.
 

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Value depends not just on condition but whether it's a standard grade, custom grade or custom deluxe grade.
 
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