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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Obviously a trooper is not going to put his name on government property. The lettering looks to 'neat' and concise to be hand carved by a latter owner. So is this a company applied marking when the gun may have been sold to for surplus? And whats with the sideways letter 'P'? Any and all comments welcome!


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Aside from the queered 'P' (who hasn't done that before with a stamp/ Though, usually fully upside-down:)) - the trooper was probably attending to how it presented while in the carbine holster and mounted.
 

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Except that the trooper couldn't/wouldn't do that to his issued piece for fear of the fine and subsequent punishment for defacement - and when you're not making but $21 per month, any fine hurt.

This sort of 'decoration' happened when civilians got them into their hands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Interesting. I did a Google search with 'Peerless' and noticed that a Kentucky Peerless Distilling Co. started in 1889. Can't imagine guarding shipments of handcuffs, but booze is a possibility.
 

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Interesting. I did a Google search with 'Peerless' and noticed that a Kentucky Peerless Distilling Co. started in 1889. Can't imagine guarding shipments of handcuffs, but booze is a possibility.
Or someone named Peerless bought it from Bannerman who was a massive buyer and seller of surplus military arms. His story is extremely interesting. Look up Bannerman Castle or Bannerman Arsenal. History | Bannerman Castle
 
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