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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here at Lake Norman right now temp is in the 80's and humidity in the 90's.
Inside the house is 72 degrees. Just took a pistol out of the nightstand and walked out into the garage.
Bam, no not bang, the blue pistol was instantly covered in a condensate film. Moisture on all the metal!
I have to assume moisture is internal as well. So what do??
A. Leave outside and let the metal temp adjust?
B. Bring back into the A/C and let it re-chill?

Guns for 60 years and can't recall this experience. Any input appreciated.
 

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I say, take it back in the house.

Stand it up, muzzle down and let it air dry.

Is what i do in winter with all my hunting guns.
 

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I've had this happen on my guns several times both summer and winter. As has been stated, let dry or dry with warm air. I use my 50/50 mix of motor oil and Three-In-One oil and never experienced any problems as the gun dried.

If unprotected, rust will form.

Bob Wright
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you two gentleman.
Serb, you made me smile and fond memories of standing the long guns muzzle down behind the stove at Grandma's. I never remember rust on one of the family guns. It is back in the house.
Lacking the wood stove, took Collects advice and gave it a serious dose of hair dryer.
(Didn't have hair dryers at Grandma's.)

Again, thank you both.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes BobWright, it will get cleaned when dry. Actually condensate went away pretty quickly, but the idea of condensate on a fine pistol gave me cold chiis.
 

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yes LKN. Those things get passed down.

Taught from previous gens to me.

So much to remember. So much good info forgotten and lost to time.
 

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Collects hair dryer routine is a great one! I have the same problem, all year, in east Tennessee. It applies to photography outdoors as well as gun usage. Here's what I've done for decades: Before taking a gun or camera outside I get the hair dryer. It has a "Cold Shot" capability. Put it on the coldest setting and 'acclimate' the camera and lens or the gun, to a colder temperature. Then take it out. If it still fogs up, return inside and do it again. You, then, should be good to go.
 

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This was a daily occurrence for us with our service guns in Florida. I have seen neglected revolvers from other agencies that were constantly in and out of air conditioning in humid climates that were so corroded to you couldn't get the cylinder open. Folks are shocked at the amount of condensation and corrosion that can occur. Stainless minimizes it but they can still rust. Shotguns in cruisers mounted in front of the AC vents if neglected would rust so badly internally that the magazine springs would collapse. The solution was to use liberal amounts of Remoil on all surfaces then wipe the excess off with a silicone cloth on a daily basis, leaving a thin film behind. We fired for record at least 4 times a year and the guns got a thorough degreasing then. I have carried both blued and stainless handguns daily in Florida for more than 30 years and using this method never had a speck of rust show up on the guns I carried. My stored guns get a liberal application of Rig. We also sprayed the inside of our leather holsters with pure silicone to repel moisture. You brush the holster with a bottle brush to remove dirt and grit from time to time.
 
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