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Tell us more. How can you ID as southern and skirmish location?
Vic
 
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Discussion Starter #3
The skirmish is noted in privately published books on the Civil War, as well as several times in "The War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Civil War" . The "Official Records" was a compilation of the correspondence during the war from both the north and south . It ran to 128 Volumes, each about 2 1/2 to 3 inches thick, and I believe they were first published in the 1890's.

Both fired and dropped bullets were found over the area.

The Union troops were infantry, so wouldn't have been wearing spurs.
 

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Where was the river crossing? I have seen this type of spur before I believe it is Spanish?
 
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Neat old dpur.

Goose neck ( or bird's head) spurs were pretty common around the time of the Civil War on both sides. And later along with Gal Leg Spurs and eagle or horse head spurs. Both in bronze and in steel. These have the newer style buttons instead of simple strap attachments on a military spur you see above.

As Jonny said, "The Union troops were infantry, Southern Cavalry".

708328



Fancy pair of Officer's spurs.
708339
 

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Great find! I’ve used “The Official Records” volumes over the years to locate skirmishes in Kentucky. I never found anything like that... only a few bullets.
 

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Great find! I’ve used “The Official Records” volumes over the years to locate skirmishes in Kentucky. I never found anything like that... only a few bullets.
A friend found a complete set of the "OR" at a library sale that the pages were in excellent condition, but the bindings were ratty. He had the entire set rebound which made an impressive sight.

I got into the game late and the spur is probably my best find. There were no large battles in my part of the state, but we do find a rare bullet occasionally.
 

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That it is a neat find. I recently bought a metal detector but haven't found anything worth sharing yet!
 

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I've found a few bullets, some fired, some dropped. most of the bullets were found around Marietta / Smyrna Ga. and Mud creek, found some parts of Artillery shell's [3" 6 lb I think] at Pickets mill, found a bayonet from from a Springfield a little north of Marietta at the lake block house. [battle there] .
I use to metal detect a lot, have not done much in the last few years, they have covered up a lot of the best places to hunt with Wall-Mark, Targets, Mac Donald's etc. which use to be privet property.
I would put up a pic. of the Artillery shell and some parts and the bayonet, but I traded most of them for a 1858 Remington, then traded it also.
Every once and a while during some construction of a mall going up they will still dig up some things and the word will get out, then there's a rush by those who hear it 1st to get there and hunt. that's part of the fun.
 

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I grew up in Marietta, GA near Kennesaw Mountain. On nice Saturdays we would ride our bikes to the KM battlefield park and spend the day climbing and playing on the mountain. Occasionally someone in the group would find a bullet or some other small item just lying on top of the ground! At the end of the day, we would race our bicycles down the mountain road. The head park ranger who was a friend of my parents got wind of what we were doing and after that would not let us take our bikes up to the top of the mountain! A great place to play and absorb lots of history!
 

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I've found a few bullets, some fired, some dropped. most of the bullets were found around Marietta / Smyrna Ga. and Mud creek, found some parts of Artillery shell's [3" 6 lb I think] at Pickets mill, found a bayonet from from a Springfield a little north of Marietta at the lake block house. [battle there] .
I use to metal detect a lot, have not done much in the last few years, they have covered up a lot of the best places to hunt with Wall-Mark, Targets, Mac Donald's etc. which use to be privet property.
I would put up a pic. of the Artillery shell and some parts and the bayonet, but I traded most of them for a 1858 Remington, then traded it also.
Every once and a while during some construction of a mall going up they will still dig up some things and the word will get out, then there's a rush by those who hear it 1st to get there and hunt. that's part of the fun.
I love Civil war history.............Great display!
 

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The large Parrot shell was fired from a Union gunboat on the James River east of Richmond. It was found on private land in the early 80's near where the battle of Malvern Hill was fought. It has been deactivated and is safe. The smaller Parrot shell is in 2 pieces and has no fuse. The cannon ball came out of the ground in three pieces and it had no fuse either. After it was cleaned, I was able to epoxy the pieces together.

gunboat shell.JPG
 

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One of the guys I worked with back in the 1960's lived over in Mechanicsville VA near Chicahominy swamp. He came home from work one day and the neighborhood kids were rolling what looked like a bowling ball down the street. When he got closer he recognized it as a cannon ball. He hollered at them to stop rolling that ball (as he ran away:)) Later they found it was a live shell and had it dis-armed. They had found it in the swamp, probably from McClleans peninsula campaign.
Dennis
 

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Very neat find.
 

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These shells all came from the same battlefield except the Hotchkiss on the back row left. It was found in a local house by some pickers that had bought the contents.

I found the round 3" solid "6 pounder" in front, and my son found the Confederate 4.5" case shot just to it's left. By the time we got into metal detecting the shells had just about all been found. There was an area of the battlefield that was overgrown in briars and blackberry bushes that couldn't be hunted until the timber company had a control burn clearing it out. Several more shells were then found.

The huge explosions shown in the movies during Civil War battles never happened. The shells were filled with lead or iron balls, or even reject bullets and a small bursting charge. There was just enough powder to fracture the shell hopefully in an air burst, and the shell fragments and contents continued on like a shotgun blast. Occasionally a shell like the one shown by Recusant would be found that did not detonate until it entered the ground. The fractured shell and all the contents will still be together. The solid shells were fired low along the ground to skip along among the troops.

 
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