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I have several NIB S&W & Ruger wheelguns that I don't intend to shoot.. but I have turned the cylinders when I have oiled them. Does this lessen the value if I ever want to sell them?? How can you take care of your wheel guns properly without turning them??
 

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IMHO, as long as there is no hint of a turn line, then it is still unturned. But once you have them oiled, or protected in some way with Renn wax or Rigg grease, or whatever you choose, then don't keep turning them. Most revolvers will get a turn line if the cylinder is turned enough times, and no one can tell how many times that takes on any particular gun. The bolt "dropping" into place causes wear even if not fired. You will see Colts and other "unturned" revolvers be strapped to prevent anyone from picking up the gun and thumbing the hammer back.
 

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IMO the dread "turned" implies that they have been turned with the crane(yoke) closed and the bolt(cylinder stop or lock) dragging thus causing a "turn line". In Smiths and later (MkIII and beyond) Colts, this happens anytime you cycle the action with the crane(yoke) closed. Properly functioning older Colt actions are a little different in that the bolt is held off the cylinder for the greater part of the cycle, dropping only into the lead to the notch. The "turn line" in these is mostly the result of closing the crane and then turning the cylinder to index with the bolt dragging. If you want to oil your guns and have them appear "unturned" you would obviously need to do the turning for maintenance with the crane/yoke open and close it carefully with a chamber aligned with the barrel so the bolt is already aligned with a notch upon closing. I suppose some true collectors will also offer their views, but that is my take. :cool:
 

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I don't think anybody can truthfully swear that a revolver is unturned. Even if you are the original/first owner the gun was certainly turned at the factory, perhaps at the distributor, and very likely at the gun shop you bought it from by store employees or would-be purchasers.

Basically, in my opinion, unturned means that the revolver is unfired after leaving the factory and there is no drag line or evidence of turning.

John Gross
 

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It will be interesting to see what some have to say on this matter. Your direct question was how to keep it cleaned and like new without turning it. A patch with a protectant can be run down the front of the barrel, but certainly not all the chambers of the cylinder. I don't know if you just apply protectant one time and then let it go after that. If it remains totally unturned then its gonna be hard for anyone to tell if there is any corrosion occurring anyway. Me personally, I don't have any strapped. I thumb the hammer back to 2nd notch, ever so carefully remove the cylinder, apply protectant , and carefuly re-install cylinder, cock the hammer all the way back and then lower hammer. This is on a single action.
 

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guess I should add , as many people know, removing a cylinder is an easy way to add a scratch. people have different ways also of using paper etc. to protect the cylinder during removal. In single actions, turn lines are not as likely when properly used and may be easier to leave the cylinder in to clean it by just rotating the cylinder while hammer is cocked to the second notch. One thing is true on all guns. The more you handle it the more its gonna eventually start to show it.
 

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Which begs another question on the instance of a cylinder that isn't swing out. Would one mess with the base pin latch and base pin and carefully remove the cylinder or rather put the hammer in the proper load position to free the cylinder from the bolt and carefully turn and oil/wax the cylinder. Thinking the later would have the least issues as once a pin is pulled out to remove the cylinder I would think some marks would be evident on the latch pin? Puzzling dilemma?

ADDED: I see this was being addressed as I was formulating my reply.... :)
 

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IMHO, an "unturned" revolver is an overstatment, simple sales puffery.

The cylinder has certainly been turned at the factory and likely elsewhere, as Johngross points out.

I do not know how anybody could know with any certainty whether the cylinder has been turned after it leaves the factory, or not, on a really high condition Colt.

Of course one has to turn the cylinder to properly clean a revolver.

Thus, "unturned" probably means "unfired," which really means "unfired other than at the Colt factory," something that I also do not think can be determined by a close inspection of the revolver. If one carefully fires a few shots, or a couple boxes of ammo out of a new Colt revolver, leaves no handling marks, then cleans the revolver really well, I do not think anybody can tell whether or not it has been shot after leaving the factory.

"Unturned" is puffery; an excuse to sell the weapon for more money. When I see "unturned" in the description, I roll my eyes and think "How could he possibly know that?"

Similarly, one can remove the stocks and clean a Colt carefully (my preference is Eezox and Renaissance Wax), and still legitimately call it LNIB (if its condition warrants such a moniker).
 

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I have several NIB S&W & Ruger wheelguns that I don't intend to shoot.. but I have turned the cylinders when I have oiled them. Does this lessen the value if I ever want to sell them?? How can you take care of your wheel guns properly without turning them??
Dont pay any attention to the unturned BS. It is just a way to try to make people spend more money. All revolvers have been turned either when assembled and test fired/Proofed at the factory. The term basically means it has no signs of a touch line, which granted is very hard to find even on new guns. You are doing exactly what you are suppose to be doing, cleaning and oiling will only continue to preserve your investment. When you do clean it/wipe them down, you can line the cylinder notch up with the bolt when you shut so it doesnt touch the cylinder to prevent anymore of a "line". People make mistakes of tieing the cylinders down and not oiling, then after a few years they get surface rust on the cylinder that cannot be seen or gotten to unless they cut the tie strap. I have saw this happen a few times. Most collectors, including myself, do not deduct any for a faint touch line (not into the finish) since most vintage revolvers do have. JMHO.
 
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Of course you will "turn" the cylinder when oiling the gun. But the cylinder would or at least should be swung out from the frame before turning it( by hand). Therefore, you will not have any turn line from doing so, as the bolt/cylinder stop will not touch the cylinder. Now if you leave the cylinder locked into the frame and cock it every time to move the cylinder, you Will have the bolt dragging over the cylinder face with a smith or ruger. That's just the way it is. So if yoiu dont want a turn line then make sure you swing the cylinder out before oiling it. When you put the cylinder back in, make sure the bolt/cylinder stop (as S&W calls it), to mesh with the groove or "lead" as some call it so it doesnt drag over the cylinder face. You might still get a tiny bit of darag mark on the grooves/leads but not much.
I agree with some of the others that calling a revolver "unturned" or "unfired" or even "NIB" raises the BS flag right away. Most of these sellers CANNOT know if it is any of these things UNLESS they actually owned the gun themselves bought new from the factory.Even then the unfired,unturned,NIB obviously ONLY means after the factory sent it out. I think alot of naive buyers still buy into this hype sales pitch however.
 

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All my double actions are "utility shooters" and thus no consideration for preventing ring on DA... so Capstan's post was very informative when I make the big Colt DA purchase.
 

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With all the talk of drag lines on cylinders, it is equally important to manually retract the cylinder latch when closing the cylinder to prevent the marking of the latch face, which to me is like the dreaded frame scratch from careless replacement of slide stops on GMs. Ouch!!!
 

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My '68 Nickel Frontier Scout is so "puffery" equipped. I was temped to pull the hammer back and see how everything worked and stopped myself :) It's the only Colt I own that came from a local gentleman who bought it new, put it in the safe and 41 years later sold it to me. The factory may have done their thing but when it left the factory the aforementioned is a true testament. No doubt when I'm but dust the children will fire it and smile. :)
 

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My '68 Nickel Frontier Scout is so "puffery" equipped. I was temped to pull the hammer back and see how everything worked and stopped myself :) It's the only Colt I own that came from a local gentleman who bought it new, put it in the safe and 41 years later sold it to me. The factory may have done their thing but when it left the factory the aforementioned is a true testament. No doubt when I'm but dust the children will fire it and smile. :)
.. and mine will say " wonder why he didn't ever shoot this thing?.. oh well, who will give me $100 dollars for it"
 
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