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I suspect most everyone here has a better half that more than once said to herself, "You are a PIA to buy presents for". Raise your hand if you have heard that before :) I'm a lucky fellow. Spoiled for sure. Especially so this Christmas. Hope everyone here has been as blessed and more for the New Year.

 

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Nice wooly chaps and beaded gauntlets! Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
buffhuntr said:
More pics of the chaps!!


These are the same woolies "Chet" wore (Keith Caradine) in Monty Walsh with Selleck. Suppose to be sunny tomorrow and was hoping to get a photo with the new guantlets and woolies on a horse. If it is above zero I should be able to get that done. Till we moved here never been cold enough to use them :cool:
 

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These are the same woolies "Chet" wore (Keith Caradine) in Monty Walsh with Selleck. Suppose to be sunny tomorrow and was hoping to get a photo with the new guantlets and woolies on a horse. If it is above zero I should be able to get that done. Till we moved here never been cold enough to use them :cool:
I know nothing about horses, ranch work, etc. May I ask what the purpose is for the woolies is? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Cop_Out said:
I know nothing about horses, ranch work, etc. May I ask what the purpose is for the woolies is? :)
Sure, Hard to stay warm on a horse/saddle in cold weather. Your legs and feet can really suffer when things get cold and windy. Woolies are full leather, step in chaps that are traditionally canvas lined and the front half of the chap is also layered with a fur hide. Angora wool ( which is what mine are) and bear were very common. Sheep dog fur (harsh I know) as well or seal on the Pacific slope. In the old days you would see woolies from New Mexico, California, Nevada and north into Canada. Pretty much any place you had to ride a horse for work and it was cold.

The wool or fur lined, long "great" coats (or a buffalo coat/robe), fur lined guantlets and pair of tough leather tapaderos (covered stirrups) that were shearling lined was pretty much all the protection a guy had on a horse. Not that much different today from what I see. Interesting that pretty much all the real cold weather clothing a cowboy might wear was property of the ranch owner. And not uncommon for it to be lice invested from neglect and years of hard use.

Guns were typically carried in a shoulder holster during winter..under that heavy coat.








Commonly used for decades now. But very popular in the early Wild West shows at the turn of the last Century as "flash", in warm temps that must have made them very uncomfortable. Wearing a pair of good woolies is pretty much like climbing into a suit of armor and while warm, you won't be winning any foot races in them.

 

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Sure, Hard to stay warm on a horse/saddle in cold weather. Your legs and feet can really suffer when things get cold and windy. Woolies are full leather, step in chaps that are traditionally canvas lined and the front half of the chap is also layered with a fur hide. Angora wool ( which is what mine are) and bear were very common. Sheep dog fur (harsh I know) as well or seal on the Pacific slope. In the old days you would see woolies from New Mexico, California, Nevada and north into Canada. Pretty much any place you had to ride a horse for work and it was cold.

The wool or fur lined, long "great" coats (or a buffalo coat/robe), fur lined guantlets and pair of tough leather tapaderos (covered stirrups) that were shearling lined was pretty much all the protection a guy had on a horse. Not that much different today from what I see. Interesting that pretty much all the real cold weather clothing a cowboy might wear was property of the ranch owner. And not uncommon for it to be lice invested from neglect and years of hard use.

Guns were typically carried in a shoulder holster during winter..under that heavy coat.








Commonly used for decades now. But very popular in the early Wild West shows at the turn of the last Century as "flash", in warm temps that must have made them very uncomfortable. Wearing a pair of good woolies is pretty much like climbing into a suit of armor and while warm, you won't be winning any foot races in them.

That's very interesting, Yahoody. Thanks for taking the time to explain that to me. I knew that cowboys had a hard life, but never considered what it would be like on horseback in February. Those were tough fellas for sure.
 

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In my case I am alive, which is a small miracle, having recently been given a 0.5% chance of being here ten years after a continually worsening prognosis. As I say, I am delighted to be anywhere. To be here among men and women of integrity is icing on the cake.
 

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po18guy, we're glad you're here too. About the chaps, I don't know but I'm guessing the wool and other furs/hairs typically used also had some wicking properties to help keep the legs dry in snow or rain? Chaps in general, with or without fur/hair, I'm guessing were also for protection from thorns and brush and possibly snakebite? It's a little known fact that rattlesnakes sometimes climb up in brush when stalking prey.
 

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More pics of the chaps!!
Good thing he showed some more pictures of the "wooly" chaps.

At first, I thought he got a pair of beaded gloves and a sweet curly brunette wig.:rolleyes: Was kind of curious as to the work he was doing with those.

Very nice chaps though. I bet they are warm.
 

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When I lived in Montana back in the early 50's I found out that Levis pants came w/blanket lining for the cold country.In later years I found a pair of the most God awful RED angora sheep skin chaps I've ever seen & bought them to use occasionally when I would do a show,I don't remember exactly what happened to them but someone wanted them more than I did that was working in movies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
po18guy said:
In my case I am alive, which is a small miracle...is. As I say, I am delighted to be anywhere. To be here among men and women of integrity is icing on the cake.
Agreed Sir! Stage 4 survivor myself. As any one who has BTDT knows "survivor" doesn't really cover it. Sorry to hear about the newest prognosis. Sure glad you are still here. Harsh realization for me to finally realize none of us get out of here alive :) Hopefully one learns to enjoy what we are given.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Jim Martin said:
When I lived in Montana back in the early 50's I found out that Levis pants came w/blanket lining for the cold country.....
Wrangler fleece lined jeans are still every day wear here for a few months of the year. Handy.

Warmth? Brush and thorn protection, rain and bad weather?

Woolies are mainly for warmth. Too dang hot and bulky other wise. Batwing chaps with an open back are for the hot and real thorny country. Shotgun chaps for the colder country with plenty of thorns to go around. In the steep creek beds and canyons here we have Hawthorn brush. Places cows like to hide. Thorns will go right through a horse, a good pair of boots or a less quality chap. Another good reason for tapaderos on your stirrups. It is really nasty stuff. Sage and junipers are more typical. California has Oak. Armitas are short knee length chaps nice for some leg protection in hot weather. Both the fur and the fringe get water to drain faster off you and off the chap ideally keeping you drier for longer. But typically you don't wear a pair of woolies in the rain. Wet fur gets mighty heavy and uncomfortable. Wet and frozen canvas, fur and leather could be life threatening :).


Hawthorn brush....which is way worse than the pictures imply.



These are both shotguns chaps. The second picture also shows a short pair of tapaderos when lined with shearling they help for warmth and give added protection for your feet.









and a pair of Armitas

 

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A photo from earlier today with most of the Christmas booty. Pretty bright out there! And warm enough I was sweating under all the layers :cool:

Looks pretty warm, Yahoody! I think its really neat how much you use a hackamore. My grandpa was the cow boss on the Flying D ranch near Bozeman for quite a few years, and he loved a hackamore. He always started young horses in a hackamore, which surprised me, because I have always ridden young horses in a snaffle bit. He said he liked it because he could ask the horse to lower his head easier, and most times all he had to do was show him a hand to rein them. Looks like a nice set of horse hair reins as well!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
..... I think its really neat how much you use a hackamore. My grandpa was the cow boss on the Flying D ranch near Bozeman for quite a few years, and he loved a hackamore. He always started young horses in a hackamore, which surprised me, because I have always ridden young horses in a snaffle bit. He said he liked it because he could ask the horse to lower his head easier, and most times all he had to do was show him a hand to rein them. Looks like a nice set of horse hair reins as well!
Thanks much Garret. I really like a hackamore for a lot of reasons. Helps that I am likely closer to your Grandpa's age I guess. In my mind sure makes a horse a lot more willing when it is -10F out than putting a cold bit on them. Snaffle is great and I use one often enough. They do have their place for sure. I've found most horses that are even decent in a snaffle can be even better with little work in a hackamore. For me anyway, a hackamore makes me up my game to be a better horseman. I know when I have to go back to a snaffle on a horse I am doing something wrong. Usually a bunch of somethings and in too much of a hurry :bang_wall: Your Grandpa was a good horseman. If I had to ride a new horse every day and actually work for a living I'd be in a snaffle too.

Heard your place is looking a lot like this right now?! You guys doing OK?

 

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Thanks, Yahoody. He is a great horseman. Like many ranchers he has had a lot of back issues for a while now. He is in his 80s, and had to stop riding a few years ago, and I think it about broke his heart. He did rope a little last spring though, after a successful surgery. Yeah, we got a good storm :) up to mid thigh deep in places and knee deep most other places. We have been watching our neighbors struggles to get up hills with their john deeres, and this is where a team of horses really shine. We can still get around to just about anywhere! All is well though, and it's looking like we might have some good snow pack this summer for a change, and maybe not have so many forest fires. Did you guys get hit by the storm too?
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Good to hear! Sure like the old ways you guys use :)

I imagine it has gotta be something like this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dl4PuagBIMo


He did rope a little last spring though, after a successful surgery.


I should have said, " He is a good horseman" :) Tip of the hat to your Grandpa. Glad to know he is still working and enjoying life. Suspect he has eared it.

My Grandfather worked his ranch and livestock till he was 91. Had his last horse started at @ 72. He was still roping better than I do now, when he was 80. I aspire to be half the horseman he was. I have three more young horses to start. The two last year were a bit much for me so I'll spread these three out some. Hope to have them going pretty well by the time I am 72. Best thing I can do for them is make them useful for someone else down the road.
 
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