Colt Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Colt fans,

I recently cleaned my, what I thought almost NIB Colt Peacekeeper. What I did saw was the fact that the crane”rod” seems to be somewhat bent… Not much but. See the two photo’s.

But I’m not a Colt expert so my question to the Colt experts if this is normal? If not what could have cause this?

Thanks in advance.


 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,913 Posts
Optical illusion?

The true test is to have the crane alignment checked.

If' it's locking up properly and passes the crane alignment test, it's OK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
[ QUOTE ]
Optical illusion?

[/ QUOTE ] I hope so!

Lockup however is perfect.By the way how can I check the crane alignment? The primers for instance show a clean hit approximately in the middle.

I did ask this question because the "rod" on the crane of my S&W 686 is straight.

Thanks.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,913 Posts
The "exact" test is to use a special "thimble gage" that fits onto the end of the disassembled crane assembly.

With the cylinder off the crane, and the action disassembled, the gage is slipped over the end of the crane and it's closed.
The gage should freely enter the locking bolt hole in the front face of the frame with no resistance.

A simple test, if you don't have the gage, is to simply close the cylinder on all six chambers one at a time.

If the latch locks fully into the ejector with no assistance on each chamber, the crane is likely in alignment.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,913 Posts
I have no idea where you'd get one today.

You could have a machine shop make you one, since all it really is is a cylinder that fits snugly over the end of the crane shaft, with a smaller end that will be a snug fit in the cylinder latch hole.
After disassembling the cylinder and frame, you slip the "thimble gage" over the end of the crane shaft, close the crane, then slide the gage to the rear.
It it slips easily into the cylinder latch hole in the frame, you're okay.

To see a picture and how to use it, buy a copy of the Jerry Kuhnhausen book on whatever Colt you own.
Volume One is for the Python, Official Police, Detective Special, etc, Volume Two is for the later models like the Trooper Mark III, King Cobra, etc:

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/cid=0/k=heritage+books/t=P/ksubmit=y/Products/All/search=heritage_books
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,375 Posts
Do you know what the OD is for the end that goes into the cylinder latch hole? Is it .001" undersize? Less?

Weirdly, I don't think I've ever had a colt that had a bench crane, but it's probably a good idea to have one of these around to check in any case.



I have no idea where you'd get one today.

You could have a machine shop make you one, since all it really is is a cylinder that fits snugly over the end of the crane shaft, with a smaller end that will be a snug fit in the cylinder latch hole.
After disassembling the cylinder and frame, you slip the "thimble gage" over the end of the crane shaft, close the crane, then slide the gage to the rear.
It it slips easily into the cylinder latch hole in the frame, you're okay.

To see a picture and how to use it, buy a copy of the Jerry Kuhnhausen book on whatever Colt you own.
Volume One is for the Python, Official Police, Detective Special, etc, Volume Two is for the later models like the Trooper Mark III, King Cobra, etc:

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/cid=0/k=heritage+books/t=P/ksubmit=y/Products/All/search=heritage_books
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,913 Posts
I have no idea.
I bought mine in the late 60's, and never bothered to gage it.

As long as it fits all Colt frame holes of the same size and is reasonably snug, it should be good.
I'm sure there's a spec, since a super snug fit is going to be tighter than the tolerance for the crane fit.
In other words, there's going to be some looseness in a "perfect" crane, and the gage only has to be that tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,375 Posts
I have no idea.
I bought mine in the late 60's, and never bothered to gage it.

As long as it fits all Colt frame holes of the same size and is reasonably snug, it should be good.
I'm sure there's a spec, since a super snug fit is going to be tighter than the tolerance for the crane fit.
In other words, there's going to be some looseness in a "perfect" crane, and the gage only has to be that tight.
By "snug" you mean turn with very slight resistance when it's in the hole? Or looser than that?
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,913 Posts
Fit into the hole.
There's no need to rotate it.
The idea is, if the crane is bent, the gage just won't slide back into the cylinder latch hole at all.

By looking at where the gage is touching the breech face around the cylinder latch hole, you can determine which way its bent.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,913 Posts
"Snug" is very objective.

The gage has to fit into most any Colt cylinder latch pin hole, keeping in mind that some holes are going to be slightly larger and some may be worn.

Even if the gage is a "loose fit" you can still determine if the crane is bent.
The gage isn't to measure or gage the HOLE, its to determine if the crane is bent.
With that in mind, a gage so loose you can see a gap all around it when its in the hole will still allow seeing how the gage centers in the hole.

Judgement call.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top