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Here in California any gun sale has to go through a licensed gun dealer. One in my area charges $135. There's also a $25 FFL (Federal Firearms Licensee) transfer fee of $25 (Dealer Record of Sale). It may also be necessary to pay for an $8 lock.

My question is whether it's customary for the seller to require that the buyer or seller to pay for these fees? Or perhaps they're split?
 

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To me it's negotiable but it's usually on the buyer to eat fees to get it transferred to you. It's part of the game. Every state is different and California is not a gun friendly state. The only way to avoid it is to pull your FFL or shop FFL's transfer prices
 

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I think $135 is ridiculously high but I also don't live in CA where pretty much everything is more expensive. You have to pay to play.

In my area gun stores charge from $20-$30 locally to handle a transfer...more than that closer to the more urban areas. I guess it might matter what their overhead is plus accepting liability to inventory (even for a short time) for a firearm that isn't their property.
 

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In CT (same deal, everything is supposed to go through the FFL) they charge anywhere from $20-$50, and I agree, it's usually part of the negotiation.
 

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As a dealer, I see transfers as a disruptive hassle. If somebody buys a gun on the Internet and has it transferred through our store, I have to spend a total of at least half an hour dealing with receiving, unpacking, logging in/out, calling the buyer, helping the buyer fill out the transfer form, doing the background check etc., and including the small talk with the buyer it will usually take much longer. Still, I won't make a dime on the actual gun sale. People are complaining about the high transfer fees, but they don't see the work the dealer's put into the transfer. One guy even thought that FFLs are required by law to do free transfers for anybody who wants it. Many dealers will charge a very low fee to do it, but the reason for this is simply that they want people to come to the store, and hopefully buy something from them. All in all, the transfer fee is not the cash cow you may think it is. To many dealers, it's basically a service they provide to get more traffic in the store.

With that said, $135 sound very high but the "special regulations" and extra paperwork required in CA could very well be the reason.
 

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In CA the $100 or more fee is generally only if you are importing the gun from another state. If you are buying a gun that's already in CA it's usually about $25 for an FFL transfer.
 

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For any FFL outside of CA to be able to ship to CA he has to register with CA DOJ to become an authorized shipper. Then when he ships a gun to CA he has to get each gun approved before he ships it. This requires more work for both the shipping and recieving FFL's. So FFL's that are willing and able to ship to CA are likely to charge a higher fee as well as the recieving FFL charging a higher fee.
 

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Like taxes, business does not pay them, they collect them and forward them on.
 

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Here the dealer takes the info off the 4473 and transfers it on the computor to the state for a background check. It only takes minutes. The state gets $10 and the dealer his fee which seems to be $20 to $40 in my area. If the dealer doesn't have computor service he can just call in the information the state wants. What hurts the dealer is the wait for instant check which can be anywhere fom minutes to over an hour.

I never go into the gun shops that charge big dollars for a transfer, they make the bueacrats to costly to do business in my opinion.

Jim
 

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There are many lower cost shops. You just went to a high priced shop.

When you buy a car, the buyer pays taxes, license, insurance, etc.

When you buy a gun, you pay the fees also, unless the seller charges more and then says "all fees included."

But go to a different store. You'll get a better price.
dc

In a private party transfer, that is one California resident sells a gun to another CA resident where they both appear at the shop of the same ffl, the fee is limited by law to $35, $25 to the state and $10 to the dealer, and they will make you buy a lock (sometimes). And I believe that law says something about the ffl "must" or "shall" do that transfer. However, many refuse to do so and I can't imagine the state doing anything about that refusal.
 

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Here in California any gun sale has to go through a licensed gun dealer. One in my area charges $135. There's also a $25 FFL (Federal Firearms Licensee) transfer fee of $25 (Dealer Record of Sale). It may also be necessary to pay for an $8 lock.

My question is whether it's customary for the seller to require that the buyer or seller to pay for these fees? Or perhaps they're split?
The thread has drifted a bit from the OP's question.

If it is a face-to-face sale and the sale has to go through a dealer, which is how I understand the OP's description, obviously the seller can't require anything the buyer doesn't agree to, so you have to make that part of the deal in some way. Since you both have to go to the dealer and know his fees, that's a no-brainer.

If you buy long-distance or from out of state, it's on you. Someone who offers a gun for sale nationally online can't be expected to eat dealer-specific expenses he can't know about; if you buy the gun, in an auction like on Gunbroker, for example, what's in the auction description is the deal, usually including provisions regarding shipping costs. State and local dealer fees are your responsibility.
 

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I'd run! Move! BS fees for a GallDang gun safe? CA?!
All ya pay here in OH is tax & delivery charge.
 

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To address the OP's question: If you are having a gun shipped to the dealer and it's not a private party transfer where both of you show up to fill out the paperwork and exchange the money, it is up to the buyer to pay any and all fees. The buyer should also expect to pay the shipping charges.
In my area some retail FFL's charge as much as $100 to receive a gun, plus the $35 DROS fees which are standard everywhere. Other's charge less so I would shop around. Regarding the gun lock, unless you can show a receipt that the lock was purchased in the last 30 days, you have to purchase another one. Most sell cheap locks for $5-$8. Not a big deal. I've got a box full of them.
To all those who offered unhelpful and irrelevant answers like "move", there are a lot of reasons that those of us that live under a jackbooted government stay. Maybe you should open a new topic so the California bashing can begin.
 

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The requirement that a lock be provided is a requirement on the FFL, not the buyer. The law says the FFL SHALL PROVIDE a lock/storage device. It does not say "if the buyer will buy one from you." The dealer can refuse to transfer of course, at which point you will have to find another FFL willing to do it. But if the FFL does the transfer, it is their responsibility to provide the lock, not to sell a lock. That's why many dealers either get free locks in bulk or buy them in bulk for cheap.
 

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As a dealer, I see transfers as a disruptive hassle. If somebody buys a gun on the Internet and has it transferred through our store, I have to spend a total of at least half an hour dealing with receiving, unpacking, logging in/out, calling the buyer, helping the buyer fill out the transfer form, doing the background check etc., and including the small talk with the buyer it will usually take much longer. Still, I won't make a dime on the actual gun sale. People are complaining about the high transfer fees, but they don't see the work the dealer's put into the transfer. One guy even thought that FFLs are required by law to do free transfers for anybody who wants it. Many dealers will charge a very low fee to do it, but the reason for this is simply that they want people to come to the store, and hopefully buy something from them. All in all, the transfer fee is not the cash cow you may think it is. To many dealers, it's basically a service they provide to get more traffic in the store.

With that said, $135 sound very high but the "special regulations" and extra paperwork required in CA could very well be the reason.

It might not occur to you that the reason the purchase was made through the Internet, of from an individual, is because you did not have that particular gun in stock, or at a reasonable price.

I ordered a gun recently through a pawn shop because the dealer would not order from Cimarron.

Bob Wright
 

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It might not occur to you that the reason the purchase was made through the Internet, of from an individual, is because you did not have that particular gun in stock, or at a reasonable price.

I ordered a gun recently through a pawn shop because the dealer would not order from Cimarron.

Bob Wright
Of course I know that, it's impossible to keep everything in stock and what I said in my previous post is that FFLs are businesses that need to make money on what they do. The internet has killed many small gun shops, for example one just a few miles down the road. The owner told me that it finally got to the point where his business was pretty much down to transfers only (ie: bought off the internet by somebody) plus some ammo now and then, and there was no way he could stay in business unless he raised his transfer fee. He finally admitted defeat and closed the doors, so now people have to drive another 20-30 miles to find an FFL that operates at the rates they desire. Just to put this in perspective: Here in TN we have to pay $10/transfer to the state, and some FFLs offer fees as low as $25 out the door. This means that they make $15 per transfer, and if you figure in what it costs to run a store you'll see that this is not enough to make it go around. Some smaller outfits (like the home based basement FFLs) can do that, but they usually don't stay in business very long, and if they expand they'll soon find that they are losing money on cheap transfers.

I have seen numerous new FFLs starting up locally just in the past 10 years, most of them offering transfers at cut-throat rates just to lure in new customers. After a few years they realize that their business has turned into a transfer mill that doesn't make any money, so they close the doors and a new one pops up. At the same time, people are complaining about greedy FFLs that want to rob them blind when they need a transfer. It's pretty simple actually: If nobody wants to pay for a service, nobody will provide that service either.

Another interesting phenomenon (mentioned to me by another FFL that just closed) is that people don't even ask their local FFLs to find the guns they want. Dealers can usually buy at discounted prices from wholesale outfits, but the internet shoppers won't even ask. They'll just go for the cheapest price they can find on the internet, order it and have it transferred, not knowing that they could actually have bought the gun cheaper from the dealer. Something to think about next time you're wondering where all those nice, old gun stores went.
 
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