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Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking at used revolvers and have noticed that most have varying degrees of visible drag line.

In doing research on causes I ran across a post elsewhere by dfariswheel that said that the Python type (sorry haven't learned Colt frame nomenclature yet) should drop the bolt before cylinder movement and not release it until somewhere in the middle 2/3rds of the next leade. I have seen some (very few) Pythons exhibiting this type of drag line but the majority seem to show the drag line beginning right after the bolt notch with the worst examples showing a slight peening of the bolt notch.

OK, so those need a bit of 'smithing but what I want to know is on the Trooper/Anaconda type actions. Should any drag line look like a good Python, or is it OK if the thing has a continuous line connecting the index notches like Smiths will do?
 

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All revolvers will develop a continuous drag line with ordinary use. That's just the nature of revolvers, and is entirely normal.

The Anaconda, Trooper Mark series, and King Cobra will look much like a S&W revolver.

Where all revolvers will get the continuous line is not necessarily from shooting, it eventually comes from closing the empty cylinder and turning it until it locks.

In other words, from normal use.

All revolvers will eventually show a slight peening of the edge or the lock notch, again from normal use. The harder you cock the hammer, or pull the trigger, the sooner the gun will show the peening.

For a look at REAL peening of the notch, take a look at a single action that's been "fanned". That counts as abuse, but normal use will cause even a properly timed revolver to eventually show light peening.

Again, cylinder drag lines and peening are just normal features of the revolver.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dfariswheel:
Where all revolvers will get the continuous line is not necessarily from shooting, it eventually comes from closing the empty cylinder and turning it until it locks.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


I hadn't thought of that, but that sort of thing is exactly what I was looking for. Thank You.
 

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Hey dfariswheel!
Ya, can you imagine what lock notch on Bill Mundun's SSA's looks like. Dick
 
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