Colt Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
981 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All of my revolvers thus far have been nickel or stainless. Thinking about picking up a blue SAA (new production Colt) for a change of pace and I'd like to be able to shoot it from time to time. How many turns does it take before a drag line becomes noticeable on the cylinder. And is this something that a gunsmith should be able to remedy with a polish/action job? I have a Cimarron Uberti "Evil Roy" in stainless that has been turned a lot with no marks whatsoever.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,560 Posts
No Colt or quality replica should ever ring the cylinder if it is handled properly. Most should be timed well enough that the bolt rises into the leede, which is the ramp into the bolt notch. All that one must do is to never lower the hammer from the half cock notch. Bring it all the way back to full cock before lowering it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,709 Posts
Impossible to estimate. Over time parts will wear or timing will get a wee bit off. Depends on how often you shoot your revolvers and how you handle them. Some manufacturers revolvers will develop the beginning of a turn line after one box of ammo. I have Colt DA and SA that have no cylinder lines with some I shoot regularly and some occasionally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,514 Posts
Everything you read above is correct. Here's also a few details I hope you find helpful:

Most do not realize that once you cock the hammer, even on a properly timed SA, you MUST COMPLETE THE CYCLE!! Never drop the hammer from safety notch or half cock; always cycle all the way thru the full cock position and then let the hammer down. If you don't, you get a cyl line; the cylinder has not been moved thru its full cycle which allows the cyl latch to pop up on the cylinder surface. Also, cyl latch springs on the old or new model SAs are always too strong! Use an aftermarket lighter spring. Just don't go too light or under hard and fast cocking, you can slam the cylinder notch right past the cyl latch with potentially ugly results when the trigger is pulled. I have Colt's that I've shot for years with no ring on the cylinder at all; only a shiny spot in the 'approach ramp' to the cylinder notch.


POLISHING THE CYLINDER LATCH:

For all SA and DA revolvers - the single most important preventative action you can take and the 1st thing I do on any revolver of mine, new or used is pull the cylinder (or open it, in the case of DAs) and polish the cylinder latch! They all come with file marks just waiting to carve out a line and groove in your cylinder finish!! I have to look at the bolt surface with a 10 power jeweler's loop or my 10x gunsmith glasses to truly see if the bolt needs polishing. What looks good to my naked eye can be bad enough to carve up the cylinder. The sharp edges can really do damage and don't need to be knife edge sharp to function and have nice tight lock up. Here's how I do it:


I swing out or remove the cyl and mask off the frame and breech face all around the bolt with blue masking tape because I use a Dremel tool and it can slip off the bolt. I wear my gunsmith 10x glasses (good eye protection too) and look for any irregularities. If there are any marks, I use a VERY FINE abrasive wheel in the Dremel tool to polish out the file marks, etc., but I don't touch the sharp edges or change the contour of the bolt. If no marks, I go straight to polishing as described below.

Then with a little felt buffing wheel in the Dremel and white rouge (used for stainless steel) I put a mirror finish on it. This is when I also address the sharp edges; I leave them nice and square but just dull the knife edge with the buffing wheel and the rouge. And I don't over do it.

If the bolt needs slight re-contouring to center it in the cylinder notch leads, the very fine abrasive wheel works well followed by polishing. It only takes 3 to 4 minutes including masking and cleanup.

ONE MORE LITTLE TIDBIT TO PREVENT CYLINDER SCRATCHES WITH PROPER CARE:

Misc. circumference scratches that appear on single action cylinders can be caused while removing and replacing the cylinder for cleaning. A simple technique can easily avoid them. Cut a strip of paper about 8" long and the width of the cylinder. Insert it around the cylinder before removing the cylinder pin. Once you pull the pin, you can lift the cylinder out of the frame window by the paper and not have to worry about making contact with the edges of the frame. This is especially helpful when reinstalling the cylinder into the frame as you rotate it past the hand (cyl pawl) and align it with the cylinder pin as you push the pin back in.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top