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Looking at photo 38 above I wonder if what appears to be an arrow head in a circle is really the British War Department 'Broad Arrow' head stamp Canadian version which was the broad arrow in a "C"?

FWIW

Chuck


The standard heat treatment for the WWII slide (front) was D-50 to 56. Too much variation to be heat treatment.
 

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. . . in other words those "D something" marks still seem to be some sort of mistery. :unsure:
 

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This is my DCM Colt that was received in 1963 in like new, not rebuilt condition. The pistol has served for many years finally receiving a repark about ten years ago. I just thought of the D 44 as a rack number, however since acquiring it I have observed two others with a D and two numbers. Just another great 1911 mystery!
718580
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
This is interesting!!!! So the D44 was on the pistol in its original condition? A Colt 1911A1 frm 1943 with D44.
 

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Interesting, but I wonder if those are only "rack numbers" why in the hell the last figure is always 4 !
 

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Sergio, don't make fun of us... when this number was put on before parkerizing it is never ever a rack number...
Then rack numbers were usually painted on stocks . . .
I hope that some real expert will soon chime in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Then rack numbers were usually painted on stocks . . .
I hope that some real expert will soon chime in.
I think we have reached the end of the line... I have asked this question some years ago and we never got further than this.
It is a a bit like the "english order" on those Russian contract Colt Government pistols ... nobody knows who put it there (believe me I asked around...)
 

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Does the other side have the broad arrows in a'C' the other one has?

Thanks


This is my DCM Colt that was received in 1963 in like new, not rebuilt condition. The pistol has served for many years finally receiving a repark about ten years ago. I just thought of the D 44 as a rack number, however since acquiring it I have observed two others with a D and two numbers. Just another great 1911 mystery! View attachment 718580
 

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Chuck,
Maybe I'm confused but none of these "D" marked pistols have Canadian broad arrows stamps. The one Stan showed was to demonstrate stampings applied on top of Parkerizing. Am I missing something?
 

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kwill I think you're right, but after all I also wonder how many of them there are around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Chuck,
Maybe I'm confused but none of these "D" marked pistols have Canadian broad arrows stamps. The one Stan showed was to demonstrate stampings applied on top of Parkerizing. Am I missing something?
Hello Kwill,
I had a close look at my Ithaca No. 1213878. Receiver: not refinished, seems made by Ithaca, no markings other than the usual (crossed cannons) but already with the Ithaca inspector marks on the trigger guard.
The slide is an Itahaca replacement slide like that one:
This was an Ithaca No. 1 217 358 for sale with a replacement slide but no D44.
My barrel is a Flannery barrel....so could be original to this pistol that was made very late in 1943

When this corona thing is over I will take my Ithaca to the range and put a few rounds through it. Even if not all questions are answered it is still a great pistol.
Peter
 

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If you will look at the first photo in post 38 in this series, the pistol appears to have two arrows stamped in the gun, one on the left rear of the slide and one just above the magazine release. I think the broad arrows that look like poorly stamped "C" is in fact Canadian broad arrow "C" that denotes Canadian Government ownership at some point. On the right side is a stamp indicating the British had released the gun for disposal. This suggests it was a British gun that was ultimately released by the Canadian government. Taking the 'broad arrows' and British roll stamp indicating it was released I think this gun was in British service at some point as well as Canadian.

None of this of course answers what the D44 means... but may be a clue to be followed...

While I have not seen this sort of marking before, I think this is a reasonable surmise... albeit not common. The Brits often have non standard markings on their weapons depending on factors known only to God and some clerk in the M.O.D.

V/r

Chuck

FWIW...




Chuck

Chuck,
Maybe I'm confused but none of these "D" marked pistols have Canadian broad arrows stamps. The one Stan showed was to demonstrate stampings applied on top of Parkerizing. Am I missing something?
Chuck,
Maybe I'm confused but none of these "D" marked pistols have Canadian broad arrows stamps. The one Stan showed was to demonstrate stampings applied on top of Parkerizing. Am I missing something?
 
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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
If you will look at the first photo in post 38 in this series, the pistol appears to have two arrows stamped in the gun, one on the left rear of the slide and one just above the magazine release. I think the broad arrows that look like poorly stamped "C" is in fact Canadian broad arrow "C" that denotes Canadian Government ownership at some point. On the right side is a stamp indicating the British had released the gun for disposal. This suggests it was a British gun that was ultimately released by the Canadian government. Taking the 'broad arrows' and British roll stamp indicating it was released I think this gun was in British service at some point as well as Canadian.

None of this of course answers what the D44 means... but may be a clue to be followed...

While I have not seen this sort of marking before, I think this is a reasonable surmise... albeit not common. The Brits often have non standard markings on their weapons depending on factors known only to God and some clerk in the M.O.D.

V/r

Chuck

FWIW...




Chuck
Chuck, you have noticed that the pistol in No. 38 has no D44 marking? It is a Colt from 1943. Mit Ithaca D44 has not a trace of British markings... and they marked everything on sight.
 

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I had not put two and two together there... you are quite right... I'm wrong..

V/r

Chuck


Chuck, you have noticed that the pistol in No. 38 has no D44 marking? It is a Colt from 1943. Mit Ithaca D44 has not a trace of British markings... and they marked everything on sight.
 
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I still believe that British Proof pistols have little or nothing to do with D44 marked ones.
 

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I still believe that British Proof pistols have little or nothing to do with D44 marked ones.
Correct. There was some confusion earlier that the two were related but none of the "D*4" marked guns observed to date have British proofs.
 

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Friend sent pictures of several 1911A1 pistols in a military museum in Brazil. All the pistols were worn, but were in original finish. Among them was a March 1945 Remington Rand with a D44 marked slide.
 
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