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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand the sensitivity and concerns about individuals mishandling the SAA and causing a cylinder turn line. My question is this >> What about the DA revolver? Are there similar issues/concerns that we need to be aware of to avoid cylinder turn lines? Thanks in advance for sharing all your knowledge:)!
 

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A turn line on a double action Colt in proper time can be avoided by indexing the cylinder so the bolt falls into the cylinder notch as the cylinder is closed.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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I am still musing on this very question ( as it has formed in my mind from having been learning to Work on - or understand - the mechanisms of the Swing-out Cylinder DAs ).

Narrating from my own naïve Mental Model - I t-h-i-n-k the issue resolves on the height to which the Rebound Lever is raised, and held, during Cycling.

Or that if the Rebound Lever is not raised and held high enough, the Revolver may still cycle perfectly, but, the Bolt ( which is moved 'down' on the indexing end, by the Rebound Lever being elevated or raised ) may be just touching or lightly dragging on the Cylinder, thus making the famed 'Drag Line'.


Thus, either the Bolt needs to be a little lower on either or both of it's ends, or, the Rebound Lever needs to be elevated a little more and held there, either by the Rebound Lever itself being a little lower where it rides on the Hand base, or, the Hand Base needs to be a little higher where the Rebound Lever rides on it.

Hopefully wiser Heads than mine will help clarify this question.
 

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Much depends on the brand and design of revolver.

Almost all double action revolvers (S&W, Ruger, Dan Wesson, the newer model Colt's like the Mark III-King Cobra etc) are specifically designed to allow the cylinder locking bolt to "ride" on the surface of the cylinder for most of it's rotation.
All of these revolvers WILL leave a line on the cylinder with any use.

Only the older Colt action as used on the Python, Detective Special etc. are designed to keep the bolt away from the cylinder during most of it's rotation and drop it into the longer leade in front of the cylinder locking notches.
If you're an absolute anal compulsive fanatic about how you close the cylinder you can avoid the line, but in the Real World, any revolver that gets used will develop a line just from normal use.

If you operate an expensive sports car on a public street, you're going to pick up rock chips in the paint, and that's something you accept as part of using the car.
In the same way, if you're going to actually use a Colt over time it will develop some cylinder line.
If you own a S&W or a later Colt, if it doesn't quickly develop a cylinder line, the gun is not working correctly and needs to be repaired.

If you don't want to get holster wear on a pistol, don't ever put it in a holster. If you don't want a line on the cylinder, never use the gun.
 

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Much depends on the brand and design of revolver.

Almost all double action revolvers (S&W, Ruger, Dan Wesson, the newer model Colt's like the Mark III-King Cobra etc) are specifically designed to allow the cylinder locking bolt to "ride" on the surface of the cylinder for most of it's rotation.
All of these revolvers WILL leave a line on the cylinder with any use.

Only the older Colt action as used on the Python, Detective Special etc. are designed to keep the bolt away from the cylinder during most of it's rotation and drop it into the longer leade in front of the cylinder locking notches.
If you're an absolute anal compulsive fanatic about how you close the cylinder you can avoid the line, but in the Real World, any revolver that gets used will develop a line just from normal use.

If you operate an expensive sports car on a public street, you're going to pick up rock chips in the paint, and that's something you accept as part of using the car.
In the same way, if you're going to actually use a Colt over time it will develop some cylinder line.
If you own a S&W or a later Colt, if it doesn't quickly develop a cylinder line, the gun is not working correctly and needs to be repaired.

If you don't want to get holster wear on a pistol, don't ever put it in a holster. If you don't want a line on the cylinder, never use the gun.

You are correct
As you know, dry firing is the worst culprit even with snap caps if fired enough
It is not a simple timing issue like i was taught on a Colt SAA.."keep it in time and you wil never get a 'timing' ring!(althiough spot on timing will rediuce the wear, just won't totally prevent it)
All revolvers will leave a ring as it is virtually impossible, if you shoot the gun very much, not to develop a ring, some revolvers more than others.
it is not a timing ring, but rather a bolt drag ring which is unavoidable , IMHO, no matter what precautions you take short of never firing the revolver!
There are some basic precautions to reduce it , especially on single actions..never drop the hammer from anything but a full cocked position.Never 1/2 cock the revolver or lower the hammer manually on anything but the 4th notch.(this applies to DA revolvers when firing SA, though no 4 clicks!)
Some revolvers, particulalry S&W Model 3 SA's , i.e. Schofields in particular , were designed in such a way as to be impossible to prevent a ring as the action works by the bolt dragging on the cylinder before engaging the bolt cuts or lead in notches.The bolt lead ins are not even as pronounced as they are on a Colt SAA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you ALL for sharing your knowledge and insight regarding my question:)! It's amazing how much there is to know about the intrecacies of these finely engineered revolvers (SAA/DA). This forum is great. The knowledge continues to flow daily ...
 
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