Colt Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,631 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since I haven't heard anything back from my e-mails to my main two gunsmiths I thought I would post this here. I am disassembling a Police Positive Special from 1922 to do some custom work and eventual nickel plating for someone. The gun is super clean and probably about 97%. I have taken these apart before and had no issues on guns that were in worse shape than this one. When I took the ratchet off and removed the cylinder I was surprised to see that the crane bushing is all buggered up. Looks like the steel around the edges is kind of peened over as well. I broke my Brownells crane bushing wrench trying to get it out. I tried tapping it around with a small screwdriver and it wouldn't budge. I have no idea how to get this thing out. And when it (and if) it comes out I think the threads are going to have to be cleaned up with a tap. Anyone have any suggestions or know of someone I can send this to to get the crane bushing out of there? I know the bushing is going to have to be replaced.
Thanks for any suggestions. This is what it looks like:

 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
16,428 Posts
When the damage is that bad, often the only way to save things is to push the ejector rod fully to the rear and saw it off.
Once the rod is cut off, you can use a square type screw extractor to extract the bushing.
These type extractors are a tapered square shape with sharp corners that cut into the screw or bushing and allow turning it out.

You can make a bushing extractor by filing some steel rod to a sharp cornered, tapered square shape, then hardening it.
Push the extractor into the bushing and tap gently so the edges of the extractor "bite" into the bushing without expanding it and jamming it tighter.
Use a wrench to unscrew the extractor with the bushing.
Best to buy an extractor because they bite into the metal better and lessen the chance of the extractor slipping and making it worse.

Once the bushing is out, clean up the rear of the crane barrel and use a tap to clean up and uniform the threads.
Once everything is repaired, you can buy and install a new ejector rod, making sure the threads on it are also clean and uniform.
Other than making sure the threads are good and won't cross thread the ejector, the ejector rod is pretty much a drop in part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,631 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
When the damage is that bad, often the only way to save things is to push the ejector rod fully to the rear and saw it off.
Once the rod is cut off, you can use a square type screw extractor to extract the bushing.
These type extractors are a tapered square shape with sharp corners that cut into the screw or bushing and allow turning it out.

You can make a bushing extractor by filing some steel rod to a sharp cornered, tapered square shape, then hardening it.
Push the extractor into the bushing and tap gently so the edges of the extractor "bite" into the bushing without expanding it and jamming it tighter.
Use a wrench to unscrew the extractor with the bushing.
Best to buy an extractor because they bite into the metal better and lessen the chance of the extractor slipping and making it worse.

Once the bushing is out, clean up the rear of the crane barrel and use a tap to clean up and uniform the threads.
Once everything is repaired, you can buy and install a new ejector rod, making sure the threads on it are also clean and uniform.
Other than making sure the threads are good and won't cross thread the ejector, the ejector rod is pretty much a drop in part.
I think this may be beyond my abilities. I will probably let someone that can do this take care of it. Now you said the ejector rod is a "drop in part"
Where the ratchet screws onto it has to be in a certain position. Isn't there a risk of it not lining up quite right on a different ejector rod?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,631 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Actually now that I think about it I'm seeing more clearly what you mean. This may be something I can do. As long as like you said I can get another ejector rod and it will still work with the old ratchet.
What is the thread diameter and pitch? If I can get it out of there I will buy the appropriate tap.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
16,428 Posts
Sorry, I've forgotten the thread size. Possibly a thread gage will ID what it is.
If the threads on a different rod are slightly distorted you may be able to use a small, fine cut Swiss triangular needle file to clean them up.
Any distortion is usually only on the first one or two threads.

As long as a used ejector rod is in good shape and the threads aren't overly distorted by the staking, it should go in with little effort.
To install the ejector, just screw it on until it tightens in place and see where it is.
Usually you can just back it out to the correct position then stake it like the factory did.
For this you make a flat face punch. Possibly a small screwdriver can be modified for this, or you can just use Loctite to secure it.
Since you seldom have to remove the ejector, you could use Loctite Red for a permanent bond. If it ever needs to come off, you can warm it up with a soldering iron to soften the Loctite.

The most "polite" way is to use factory style staking so the next guy doesn't get unpleasant surprises when he tries to disassemble it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,631 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Dfarriswheel. I thought about using Loctite as well. Once the work is done and the gun is refinished I doubt anyone will ever take it apart again. A1A suggested making a more robust wrench out of a screwdriver. I may try that before cutting the rod off. Wish me luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,631 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Well, I cut the ejector rod and tried to extract the bushing with a variety of different things. The bushing material is pretty soft so I basically just ate most of it away with the various implements I was using to try to extract it. I cut off a square broken screw extractor, cut off a file handle etc. Enough material is off of the bushing that the ejector rod and spring were able to pass it. So basically it looks like a real thin layer of steel that is what is left of the bushing in the tiny bit of threads that are there. I think now the only hope is to find out what the thread pitch is, buy a tap and hope I can clean the steel out of the threads. What a damned mess. If I'm able to fix this I don't think I ever dare to take one apart again.

Well searching the web for the thread pitch is completely useless. No information available. It would be easier to have my machinist friend make a crane bushing and tap the crane to fit it at this point. If anyone out there knows what the thread pitch is please let me know. Or maybe I can just get a crane bushing and have him figure out what the pitch is and tap it for me. God I wish I was better at this stuff.

Thanks!
 

·
Forum Friend
Joined
·
5,858 Posts
If I may join in --- assuming this is similar to the New Service (seems confirmed looking at exploded view), a tap to clean the thread will be very expensive - if you can even find one. A solution from a similar situation -- needs a lathe, with a new bushing, measure the thread & turn a duplicate thread on a piece of drill rod, then make your own tap. With a triangle file, one side ground flat, file lengthwise slots in your threaded rod & relieve behind each to resemble a tap. With my guess at small diameter like about 5/16", 5 such slots. Once you have your tap made, harden it and either drill a test hole in something for a test, or very carefully clean your problem hole with your tap.

I never did it on a Colt but I have had occasion to make a few such taps. It's quick & dirty but for one use on a problem has been successful. First time I needed an odd tap I sought help from our Engineering Manager whom I knew to be a home shop machinist, who found a source in Chicago but astro-priced. I decided to make one as described above. Told him what I did & he was flabbergasted I only guessed at rake & clearance angles, etc.

While on the subject of the quick & dirty, here is my version of a tool for the ratchet & another for the bushing (id undamaged).

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,631 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If I may join in --- assuming this is similar to the New Service (seems confirmed looking at exploded view), a tap to clean the thread will be very expensive - if you can even find one. A solution from a similar situation -- needs a lathe, with a new bushing, measure the thread & turn a duplicate thread on a piece of drill rod, then make your own tap. With a triangle file, one side ground flat, file lengthwise slots in your threaded rod & relieve behind each to resemble a tap. With my guess at small diameter like about 5/16", 5 such slots. Once you have your tap made, harden it and either drill a test hole in something for a test, or very carefully clean your problem hole with your tap.

I never did it on a Colt but I have had occasion to make a few such taps. It's quick & dirty but for one use on a problem has been successful. First time I needed an odd tap I sought help from our Engineering Manager whom I knew to be a home shop machinist, who found a source in Chicago but astro-priced. I decided to make one as described above. Told him what I did & he was flabbergasted I only guessed at rake & clearance angles, etc.

While on the subject of the quick & dirty, here is my version of a tool for the ratchet & another for the bushing (id undamaged).

Do you think no one makes a tap for that thread size and pitch?
 

·
Forum Friend
Joined
·
5,858 Posts
All I can offer is hipshot opinion. From my little experience, the suppliers of odd size taps seem to be confined to the various 'standard' sizes rarely seen in this country, some foreign & still in use, as well as obsolete. There might have been some special sizes that I wouldn't have recognized.

My guess is there is someone who has made a tap as I did & might sell or lend it if you can find him. That means inquiry, networking and the magic solution, luck.

To ID the tap by description of its intended job might find it if in the hands of a gunsmith but to a dealer or trader in such stuff a description with its diameter & threads per inch would be necessary.

Wish I could furnish an answer & sorry my ramble doesn't offer any specific info & only my vague thoughts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,631 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks to all who responded here. And to A1A for messaging me the right thread pitch. My friend that runs a machine shop was able to repair it and rethread it for me.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top