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A local gun dealer told me that 100,000 GI 45 auto pistols will be released through the DCM sometime soon. This would have an obvious affect on the value of 45's. Has anyone else heard confirming information?
 

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I'm sure other more knowledgable folks will chime in, but my general understanding is that the number to be released is 10k to 12k 1911s per year; that they will be offered up by DCM via lottery among those who pre-sibmit applications; and that the prices for the most beat-up ones are expected to be more than $1k. So I really doubt there will be much affect on values.
 

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If you own mismatched, refinished .45s with parts from several different decades, then I would say the value of your guns will possibly drop a bit if/when the CMP guns are sold.

If you own nice matching, original finish guns...I'd say you have nothing to worry about. There aren't too many people feeling like they have to buy a nice original gun because they can't find a much cheaper pistol. But there are a lot of $1500+/- guns being sold right now that will not be nearly as attractive to the group of folks who want those guns once CMP starts selling.

There will be flocks of people trying to by through the CMP for the same reason there are those who buy lottery tickets every week. They're hoping to get something for (near) nothing. In reality, I think the CMP sales will result in more getting nearly nothing for something...about like most lottery players.
 

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There will be flocks of people trying to by through the CMP for the same reason there are those who buy lottery tickets every week. They're hoping to get something for (near) nothing. In reality, I think the CMP sales will result in more getting nearly nothing for something...about like most lottery players.
All the guns sold by the CMP will be assessed, graded and priced accordingly. Everything they sell is described in detail and there are numerous grades of everything they sell. If you're disappointed with a purchase it's solely because you didn't do your homework. Most people I spoken to or post I've seen online regarding condition of items purchased from the CMP are surprised in a good way at the condition they receive them.
 

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All the guns sold by the CMP will be assessed, graded and priced accordingly. Everything they sell is described in detail and there are numerous grades of everything they sell. If you're disappointed with a purchase it's solely because you didn't do your homework. Most people I spoken to or post I've seen online regarding condition of items purchased from the CMP are surprised in a good way at the condition they receive them.
Have you talked to anyone who has received pistols in this release? Being pleased with rifles is one thing. Rifles, while in service, were regularly maintained and kept up to standard. Pistols were NOT regularly scheduled for maintenance. They only had things done when someone sent them in. The M9 was adopted more than 30 years ago. I don't think there has been a lot of maintenance done on obsolete pistols in recent years. I seriously doubt the majority of pistols sold this time around are going to be anything comparable to those released and sold through the DCM 55+/- years ago.
 

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I suspect any nice guns will be grabbed by the DCM volunteers and employees. Any leftovers will go to auction like collectable rifles do now. What is leftover is what Scott described above. I think you stand a better chance of getting a nice GI .45 on Gunbroker or a similar site. Additionally you can look at pictures and do not have to go through the convoluted procedure DCM has come up with.
 

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The pistols have been sitting in storage for the last 30 years. Part of the reason they are going to the CMPis because it will save money getting rid of them.


I have no idea what condition they are in. How much where the pistols used compared to rifles? What's the service requirements for 1911's vs Garands?
 

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I suspect any nice guns will be grabbed by the DCM volunteers and employees. Any leftovers will go to auction like collectable rifles do now. What is leftover is what Scott described above. I think you stand a better chance of getting a nice GI .45 on Gunbroker or a similar site. Additionally you can look at pictures and do not have to go through the convoluted procedure DCM has come up with.
Hi Hootch, Yes there were some nice guns available to the volunteers years back ( yes I did get a couple when I went down.) But the Volunteer program was discontinued about 10yrs ago. Surprisingly the employees when I was there showed little interest in the mass of guns. Truman
 

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I was assigned to the armory in my Army troop for awhile when we still had the 45 in service. OK guns but real rough and worn out. If you can get a mint one, OK, but why spend 1K on a used gun when you can get a new one cheaper? Just because its older does not mean its better.
 

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If they are actually released to and sold through the CMP, I am certain that the current market value will be assigned to these pistols based on evaluation and inspection of said pistols. That will, in my opinion, preclude anybody getting a highly desirable collector piece by accident like was done back in the 60's when the CPM originally sold pistols.

I could be wrong....but based on the informational releases I have read from the CMP on the proposed process surrounding the sale....I doubt it.

But like Scott said about Lottery Tickets....you can always dream of being a winner. :)
 

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There may be an up-side to thousands of shooter grade G.I. pistols on the market. It may increase interest, with the next generation, in the shooting sports in general and the hobby of collecting in particular. If we, as a community of firearm enthusiast, don't do something to excite young folks about the history, lore, craftsmanship and design of antique and vintage firearms we won't have to worry about the value of our collections.... there won't be anyone interested in buying them.
 

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I agree with Rick, if the release of G.I. 1911s increases shooting sports and collecting interest with the next generation it should be a good thing. Hopefully there will be some decent 1911s available for release and those lucky enough to win the lottery will have something to be proud of. Having said that, if what I saw and used in the Marine Corps prior to the switch to the M9 in the mid-80's were indicative of the majority of what was held by the rest of the armories, the 1911s are very well used. A random sampling at the time indicated that most were a combination of parts from various 1911s. When a slide or frame developed a crack and was no longer serviceable, the remaining parts went into the parts bin to be joined with other parts and remade into a 'new' 1911. One of the last times that I qualified with the .45, my pistol had a 1945 Colt frame, a Remington-Rand slide and various contractor replaced minor parts. There were frequent stoppages on the firing lines at the time due to the replacement of parts without them being properly fitted or due to the poorly made, lowest contracted magazines. The overall result of these pairings made many of the 1911s into 'jammamatics'. In comparison with the poor state of the 1911s, when the new M9 was introduced, the reviews were very favorable. This optimism was due to pistol scores going up substantially with the M9, mostly due to the smaller caliber and the fact that the new pistols didn't jam like the 40+ year old 1911s. I'll caveat this information by saying that what I saw might not be representative of all of the remaining 1911s that were in the entire DOD inventory. Marines shoot their weapons...a lot... and it is possible that the USMC pistols led a harder life and were used more frequently than the other services pistols. Even so, we're talking about pistols that were last produced for the military in 1945. The last time I saw the 1911 being used as a primary sidearm was by the Sea Bees during the Gulf War in 1991. That means that in some cases, these pistols were still in action 46 years after production! The bottom line is that for those who just want to hold a piece of history and have an occasional shooter, then they should be satisfied with the release of the 1911s by the CMP. But for the majority of those who desire to pickup a really pristine collector piece, they will probably do better by choosing one from among the auction houses and other venues.
 

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There may be an up-side to thousands of shooter grade G.I. pistols on the market. It may increase interest, with the next generation, in the shooting sports in general and the hobby of collecting in particular. If we, as a community of firearm enthusiast, don't do something to excite young folks about the history, lore, craftsmanship and design of antique and vintage firearms we won't have to worry about the value of our collections.... there won't be anyone interested in buying them.
Gosh, isn't that the truth.
 

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It's a test program the first two years for 10,000 a year,then the government will decide about the balance. Cmp sales mail order only and date to be announced this year. Go to cmp site for details.
 

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"if the CMP were to ever receive them from the United States Army.
"
That quote is off of the CMP web site.
 
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