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Discussion Starter #1
I posted a while back about the six inch Diamondback .38SP I bought new, unfired, but it was all gunked up and needed a good cleaning.

Well, the cleaning turned out to be not such a big deal. Took the grips off and there wasn't anything there, looks like brand new. Took some gun oil and wiped it down with a soft cotton cloth. Took a little rubbing, but it came clean okay.

Here's the disappointment: when I purchased it, the seller told me it was an "R" series and I thought it would be a first year production for the six inch barrel. Turns out to be s/n S643xx which puts it in the 80's. I wasn't too terribly upset until I saw after cleaning that the barrel does not match. The frame and cylinder are a bright lustrous blue with a cylinder turn line that you need a magnifying glass to see. The barrel is sort of dull and lifeless, although the bore certainly looks like it has never been fired.

I spoke with Pittsburgh Handguns and they told me it was not uncommon for Colt to "piece-meal" the manufacture of these revolvers with different parts during the later years of production. I feel pretty confident it is all original, but from a collection standpoint, I am a bit disappointed. Learn something new everyday.

[This message has been edited by manderson (edited 05-14-2005).]
 

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I am reasonably sure you have an original gun. I have seen several DBs that the barrel left a lot to be desired on the polishing. In fact I have a 6" 22LR that has a barrel duller than the rest of the gun, but it is all original. I don't think you need to worry.

------------------
Dick

The watchwords for all mankind are.....Liberty and Freedom.
 

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Try polishing the barrel with something like Flitz or Semichrome to see if you can get it to match the frame and cylinder.
I've had several dull looking guns 30 to 50 years old that polished back up to near new looking. Wiping with oil will not clean it.
 

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Manderson: Sorry you are disappointed with the 6" 38sp DB. These bluing variations are not uncommon. There is no pricing differential between a first year 6" and a later manufacture 6" DB as of yet. Guess this might be a natural progression of establishing value as the prices keep going up on these firearms.

Majic: I have always wondered about using something like Flitz on a blued gun. Until now, I have never tried it. Doesn't the bluing get removed during the polishing?
 

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I just would NOT use any polish that conyains ANY abrasive on a blued gun,as we have all seen what mild chafing from even the softest of leather holsters can do,plus palms of hands to backstraps.

Always has seemed to me that the "shine" was best put there by the wonderful,or not so wondeful, polishing job at the factory,prior to bluing. Yes,there are certainly different qualities of types of bluing,but the polish is underneath.

I just clean any oil,"pawprints" etc. off with alcohol,give it a good buffing with the softest cloth I can,then lightly coat the gun with "Sheath" for longer term protection.

Just my 2 cents. Bud
 

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manderson-I'm a devoted user of Flitz, but on stainless only. I tried it on the blue of an old rifle(under the stock) and it WILL polish the blue right off, leaving a lovely polished-bare of any finish whatsoever-piece of steel. Before using it on your Diamondback, make sure to test it on something a little less expensive. -Asa
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well, I am certain this Diamondback is like it came from the factory, especially considering the comments I have received. Just has two tiny nicks on the right side of the barrel, nothing much to worry about.

I will leave it as is. If I find a better one somewhere down the road for the collection, maybe I'll use this as a shooter.

Thanks for all the responses.
 

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Using Flitz on bluing will remove it because it is an abrasive. I would not consider that good advice to try to improve the sheen on the barrel. It will ruin the factory finish. A wax might help a little, but the variation mentioned is common.

I use nothing that alters the original finish, although some seem to like polishing up brushed stainless until it shines bright.

[This message has been edited by JudgeColt (edited 05-17-2005).]
 
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