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Discussion Starter #1
I read a post on another forum where an owner of a DS-II and Magnum Carry said he had reliability problems with the guns. He also said that a Colt representative, while demonstrating a DS-II to him, had the gun lock up after the second shot was fired. His view is that Colt had a good, reliable lockwork design with the Detective Special but that the "new" lockwork in the SF-VI and later models resulted in a more trouble-prone design.

I was just curious if anyone here has any experience or comments to add in this regard...

[This message has been edited by DHart (edited 03-23-2005).]
 

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The SF-VI did have one problem, but this was actually operator error.

The trigger return spring was so light, the SF-VI had probably the lightest trigger pull in double action of any production revolver ever made.

The trouble was, the user could fail to allow the light trigger to go back far enough forward to reset, and the trigger would seem to lock up until it was fully released.

In the SF-VI manuals, at least, Colt noted that owners who had problems could return the gun to the factory, and Colt would install a heavier trigger return spring for no charge.

I "think" Colt just went with the heavier spring by the time the DS-II was issued.

As for as being trouble prone, the "SF" frame's action is more or less a reduced size King Cobra action.

Due to the amazingly simple action, Colt almost certainly had LESS problems than with the older "D" frame's Byzantine mechanism.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
dfariswheel... I take it by your comments that the King Cobra has an excellent lockwork mechanism. And that you have no qualms as to the reliability of the SF/DS-II lockwork.

I've been considering buying a King Cobra... next to the Python, how does the King Cobra rate as far as overall quality, reliability, and feel of the action?
 

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I have a SF-VI and have put a couple hundred rounds of fairly mild .38's through it with no problems whatsoever. The trigger IS light, but no problems there either. Actually, the action is Python-smooth(I have three of those). I like it a lot, and my wife loves it. -Asa
 

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Discussion Starter #5
dfariswheel... thanks so much for the education. I also did the search and found a lot of useful material... much of it from your earlier posts. Thanks again.
 

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I'd suggest doing a search on this forum under "Python", "Trooper", and "King Cobra". There's some good info on the history of these guns.

Basically, the King Cobra is an entirely different gun than the Python, and the two designs have virtually nothing in common.

The Python is the last of the old hand-fitted Colt revolvers, in which almost every part was made over-sized, and was hand fitted by a Master fitter who filed and stoned the parts to assemble a working revolver.

In addition, the Python receives even more custom honing and adjusting, in what amounts to a true custom built revolver.

The King Cobra was the last in a series of revolvers that were replacements for the hand fitted Colt's, which had gotten just too expensive to make.

This series started with 1969's Trooper Mark III, and progressed through the Trooper Mark V, the King Cobra, the DS-II/Magnum Carry, and to todays Anaconda.

These revolvers were designed to use parts made to very close specs, and were assembled by simply selecting parts from a bin until a proper fit was achieved.

These newer guns, like the King Cobra, are actually closer in design to the Ruger or S&W than the Python.
In fact, Ruger, like most other modern revolvers based much of their design on the Colt Trooper Mark III.

The Mark III/King Cobra is a modern transfer-bar ignition action, and this design was so good, every revolver designed since basically copied Colt's design.

The old Python type gun's parts can often be re-fitted when worn.

The new types cannot. In these guns, defective or worn parts are simply replaced with new parts.

One big difference between the guns, is the old models used Colt's "Vee", double-legged mainspring to power the entire action.

The King Cobra uses separate coil and torsion springs to power the hammer and trigger.
This means the King Cobra has an entirely different "feel" than the Python's trigger action.
Not better or worse, just different.

The King Cobra is an absolute tank of a revolver, with an action definitely NOT subject to the "weak" action the Python is accused of having.

The Python action WILL NOT stand abusive treatment such as firing double action as hard and fast as the trigger can be yanked. NO revolver will take much of this, but the much smaller, more intricate parts of the Python will take less.

Colt solved any such concerns with the Mark III/King Cobra guns.

The King Cobra was considered to be probably the strongest mid-frame revolver ever built, by master gunsmith Jerry Kuhnhausen.

In fact, about the only "weakness" the King Cobra has, is there's a "chance" an occasional firing pin "may" be too hard, and if the revolver is dry-fired too much, the pin may break.

This requires a trip back to the factory for replacement, since the job REQUIRES special support jigs, and pressing tools to safely replace the pin.
Attempting this without the factory tooling CAN ruin the frame, so this is a factory-ONLY job.

The "fix" for this one weakness, is to use snap caps if you want to dry-fire.

As for the King Cobra specifically, it really IS a "tank" among revolvers.
The action while feeling different from other revolvers, is excellent.

Accuracy and quality of fit and finish is usually a definite step above other, competing revolvers by S&W, and Ruger.

The Python is the finest production double action revolver ever built, or likely to be built.
I'd rate the Python as the Rolls Royce.

The King Cobra is a Mercedes Benz, to S&W's Cadillac Seville, and Rugers Chevrolet.
 
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