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Or was it just named the ".357"?

Did .357 Troopers (not Mk III) or .357's ever come in factory nickel?

Thanks.
 

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Yes.

The first post-war new revolver Colt introduced was the 357. The .38 Special and .22LR Trooper model followed, shortly.

In 1960/61 the 357 was discontinued/rolled into the Trooper line, and it was available in .38 Special, .357, and 22LR.

Both the 357 and the Trooper was available in bright nickel.
 

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yes , the Florida Highway Partol had some .357 trooper and the model before that the .357 . both nickel with 5 inch barrels , hope this helps rj
 

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Yes, Doctors! I concur! But while we're on the subject - why the heck did they do all these things?! The ONLY reason I can think of, as a, "Let's-pretend-marketing-expert-for-Colt," is the allure of the NAMES!? Would that be sufficient? (I'm referring to the name changing on the SAME GUNS.)
 

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I agree,with the marketing ideas! Its somewhat like a couple of trim changes & its a Mercury Monarch instead of a Ford Granada! It is called "Badge Engineering" in the Heavy Truck business! Bud
 

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It wasn't marketing hype.
The 357 and the early Trooper were NOT the same gun.

The Trooper was actually an Officer's Model Match without the better finish, a non-hand tuned action, and a different barrel.
On the early Troopers, the firing pin was mounted on the hammer, just like the OMM.

The 357 was supposed to be Colt's premium belt gun, with a high grade finish and a tuned action. It had a firing pin mounted in the frame and the special heat treating to handle the .357 round.

The Trooper was to be the budget gun police departments and sportsmen could afford, and the 357 would fill the spot the Python usurped.

The Python "messed" it all up, and Colt found themselves making a series of three guns that were very similar: the premium Python, the budget Trooper, and a sort of in between 357 Model that just didn't fit.

When Colt finally decided to kill off the superfluous 357, they simply changed the Trooper center fire frame to the same as the 357 and Python, but gave it the lesser finish and fitting of the Trooper.

This simplified the line to a budget Trooper in .357, .38, and .22LR, and the Python.

So, the 357 vs. Trooper was more than just a change in "paint and trim". The distinction did get confused by the Python, but in the early 357/Trooper there was a definite difference.
One was a cheap Chevy, and the other was a Cadillac.
 

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Nice discussion, DFaris. We can always count on you to give the the technical history on our Colts. Thanks for the valuable post. Charlie Flick
 

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dfaris, I thank you, too. Teacher, I'm sorry and I promise I'll pay more attention! You HAVE told us all this before, haven't you!? I'll stay after school and clean your guns, if you'd trust me to! The good news is ANY of these are terrific pieces! Even the most humble of the litter - the first Troopers with the older style firing system is a combat version of one of the best bullseye guns, ever. The OP of the period is far from shabby, too, and it never did get the transfer bar, the target hammer and never even a glimpse of the target stocks. Ya' steps right up, ya' pays the man yer' money and ya' makes yer' choice!
 
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