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Discussion Starter #1
Another newbie question. The only difference I can see in photos between the Official Police in .38 Spec. and the Police Positive Special in .38 Spec. is the shape of the trigger guard, the former being shaped like the New Service and the latter being a smooth oval. Are there any other differences?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Thanks for the information. I assume the I-frame is heavier than the D-frame, but weight is not my concern, since I'm not going to carry the gun.
I handload a middle of the road .38 Spec., and enjoy informal target shooting.
JT
 

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You assume correctly. The I-frame is heavier than the D-frame. A "middle of the road" load should be fine in a D-frame. My range load for my Detective Special is a 158 gr. lead semi-wadcutter at about 750 fps out of the 2" barrel
 

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The Official Police (OP) and Police Positive Special (PPS) are built on 2 entirely different frames. The PPS is built on Colt's D-frame. It is the same frame used for the shorter cylindered Police Positive, the Diamondback (PPS w/ adjustable sights and vent rib), the Detective Special, Banker's Special, Cobra, Agent, Courier, and Commando Special (parkerized Detective Special). It is Colt's next to smallest frame size, the smallest being the Pocket Positive. The .38 special, the D-frames, even steel should NOT be given a steady diet of +p or heavy loads.
The OP is built on Colt's I or medium frame, also called the .41 frame because it was first offered in .41 long colt. Colt used this frame for the Army Special, Official Police, Officer's Model, Python, the ".357", and the Commando (WWII parkerized OP), and early Troopers. The OP can handle ANY .38 special load, even .38/44 loads. I use nothing but +p in my OPs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Now, to translate that into Smith & Wesson, with which I am more familiar, is the I-frame similar to the K-frame Smith?
And where would the D-frame fit into the Smith scheme of things?
 

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To Translate "Smith to Colt": D Frame is equivalent to I frame(or the later J Frame).Other than the Pocket Positive,this is Colts smallest D.A. frame,but can handle 6 .38 cartridges.The I frame Smith was originally designed for the .32,and can only handle "5" .38 cartridges(witness the Terrier,Chiefs Special etc. in .38). The E, & later I frame,(slight mfg. differences)could handle "6" .41 Long Colts,and are sometimes called a ".41 Frame). They are the mid size,like the K Frame S&W.(but they will NOT handle modern 10 mm or .41 Magnums). Colts sadly discontinued New Service D.A. was their largest frame,quite a bit bigger than the N Frame,or largest S&W. Colts tend to run several ounces heavier than comparable S&Ws,and in my opinion can handle tougher loads(but that doesnt mean that they cant be wrecked with stupidity!). Bud
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Received an Army Special today, my first Colt commercial revolver (I have some military Colts). Boy, is this thing shiny - what a polish they put on in those days. The SN is 344710, ca. 1912, right?
The grips are numbered 344709 - hand written or scratched, can't tell. Is this common? Sounds like a factory mixup.
Anyway, I fired three primed cases to check indexing, and everything looks good. The bore, chambers, and grips are exc. The finish is 90-95%.
I can find the serial only on the crane and the frame under the crane (and the grips). Is this correct?
JT
Thank you for the information. It certainly compares in size and weight to my S&W M&Ps.




[This message has been edited by jacobtowne (edited 08-19-2004).]
 
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