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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got to the range with my agent recently and I'm worried I might have bought one with a bulged chamber. Gun shoots fine but extraction is diffucult even with light loads. Inspection under a bright light with magnification I can't see any defects. All chambers are spotlessly clean with no obvious defects. Is it possible one of the chambers has a bulge not visible to the naked eye? Is there any solution other than a new cylinder? I don't have a lot of money tied up with this little gun but would hate to think I got taken. Any suggestions or solutions would be greatly apprecieated.
 

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Step one is to buy a Brownell's chamber cleaning brush and clean the chambers, even if you just KNOW it's clean.

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/P...CHAMBER+BRUSHES
These are special extra-stiff over-sized brushes specifically made to clean all fouling from a chamber.

Usually if there's a chamber problem, you can see it.

After cleaning, buy a different brand of ammo, preferably a quality brand.

Check the mouths of the chambers under the ejector for burrs or sharp edged that may be intruding into the chamber.

Test fire again.
 

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When you say extraction is difficult,do you mean hitting the ejector rod,and getting NO movement from the ejector and the brass?--- or just a slow,hard push to get the fired cases out??

IF this is the first "snub" you have owned/fired,keep the SHORT ejector rod length in mind-BUT Colt "snubs" are a helluva lot better than S&W snubs,with an even shorter rod(due to the ejector rod lock lug under the barrel.)

In short(pardon the pun!)I am saying that snubs don't eject as easily as longer barrels,and if cases are really expanded,even a sharp poke on the tip,the cases won't clear the cylinders fully,due to the short rod.

Clean it,and clean it again,like dfaris said and see if it looks clean looking from FRONT of cylinder. Former lady friends' ex had left her an early Cobra,that had fired full wadcutters-alot. And while chambers "looked" clean,there was lead build up by the step in the cylinder that made ejection difficult(well not with her!!)

Good Luck,

Bud /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I own MANY snubs (about 15 at last count), most are colt in various incarnations. This is the first time I've had a problem like this. The difficulty required me to tap on the extractor with a small wood mallet in order to get the brass started out of the chambers. The ammunition was my own midrange wadcutters(I've been loading for 35 years) I'll get some stiffer brushes and clean the chambers again. I'll also inspect the mouth of the chambers under the extractor to see if I can find any burrs or other thing causing drag. After I shoot it again I'll get back with a range report. Thanks for the helpful ideas guys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, scrubbed the chambers again. The shoulders in front of chamber were very clear and I could even detect tiny machining marks so I assumed the chambers were clean.
Then inspected front and rear of cylinder under one of those bench mounted magnifyers. front was spotless. On the rear however I found a potential problem. On the mouth of one chamber I found what looked like a tiny dent. Closer inspection revealed that something had struck the cylinder and displaced a tiny amount of metal into the chamber. It seemed too small to have caused my problem but needed to be removed anyway. A few strokes of a curved needle file took off the higher part of the protrusion. Then with a dremel tool and a fabric pad I polished it smooth and paralell to the chamber. Since I couldn't find anything else out of the ordinary it was time for a range test.
Today I made it out to the range and with no small amount of trepidation fired the first cylinder full. When I opened the cylinder four cases fell out on their own and remaining two required only a slight push on the ejector rod. Fired the remaining fifty without a hitch. Still can't believe that tiny burr caused such a problem.
Anyway problem is gone now. Again thanks for all your help.
 

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I once sent in a used Colt Detective Special to be hard chrome plated and had a chamber mouth problem.

Metaloy in Arkansas had just been bought by a new owner, and the customer had heard about an extra coarse finish they called "Starburst" that did a better job of hiding light pitting.

When the gun came back, it looked great, but when the owner fired it the first time he couldn't get the cases out AT ALL.

He brought it back to me and I tapped them out, then test fired it.
Same thing, cases stuck super tight.

I tracked the problem down to the chamber mouths.
The new plater had allowed the hard chrome to build up slightly on the sharp chamber mouths, and the sharp ridges were gripping the expanded cases tightly.

I used a ceramic rod to lightly polish the slight buildup off and everything was OK.

Talked to the new owner, and he had no idea such things could happen. I put it to a new owner who knew nothing about plating, and the old owner hadn't done a very good job training him.

He too sold out soon after, when it became apparent that he just didn't have the knowledge or desire to learn them or the skills.

Bottom line, it really takes very little to cause case sticking, and in my experience, other than a fouled chamber the most common problem is somewhere around the chamber mouths.
It doesn't take much, just a slight burr or dent.

I've seen very few chambers that genuinely needed an actual chamber polish, but this is most people's FIRST option, even when it's clear the chamber is in good condition.

Kind of like recoil springs. If ANYTHING is going wrong, the first thing they do is start dropping in "extra-power" springs.
 
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