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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello folks!
I want to get your thoughts on what happens to firearm values when firearms that are "retired" are later brought out of the archives?

Example: Colt cobra was laid to rest, and has since been rebirthed. I know the rebirth is not the same gun, but still curious if that increases values of the original, decreases, or maybe its indifferent?

I was wondering the same thing with the Smith 610...I think it was the only 10mm revolver and stopped being made. You see prices increase, then Ruger starts making a 10mm redhawk. I know this is not quite the same as the above, still just curious to get folks thoughts.

Thanks in advance.
 

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I'm going to say there's not much impact. I'm guessing most people aren't cross shopping 40 year old Cobras and new ones.

Ruger had a 10mm Blackhawk years ago. The prices in them have also been going up. The new models seem to draw attention to the older models just as much if not more than decreasing the demand for the older variants.
 

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Discontinued models will always be speculative when determining value. Many variables determine pricing including trends, internet, Hollywood, magazine articles, laws, dealer hype and so on. For myself, I don’t see why any of the SF VI or DSII models would sell for more than the current cobra. Asking prices are more though.
 

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Hello folks!
I want to get your thoughts on what happens to firearm values when firearms that are "retired" are later brought out of the archives?

Example: Colt cobra was laid to rest, and has since been rebirthed. I know the rebirth is not the same gun, but still curious if that increases values of the original, decreases, or maybe its indifferent?

I was wondering the same thing with the Smith 610...I think it was the only 10mm revolver and stopped being made. You see prices increase, then Ruger starts making a 10mm redhawk. I know this is not quite the same as the above, still just curious to get folks thoughts.

Thanks in advance.
It does eliminate some of the potential buyers who would have been forced to bid on the older versions of the gun.

Many of the potential buyers will get a new one.

That may mean fewer bidders and eventually lower prices on the older versions (especially the less than perfect older guns).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone...I know the question doesn't really have a definitive answer...and it could always differ gun to gun and even differ on the same gun at different times. Getting everyone's opinion is what I needed and its appreciated
 

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If the 'New Cobra' was really new production of the original Cobra or DS or Magnum Carry, then it would lower values of those older ones, probably.
but it isn't...
Did the Gen3 SAAs lower values of the Gen1s? I'm not so sure a new version, even a direct copy, typically affects the collectibility of the original models. It probably increases interest in them.
 

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People thought this would happen when the Italians started to make percussion revolvers in the 1950s, but the market proved perfectly capable of discriminating between antique and new.
 

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The new Super Redhawk will be a good gun but it will never be as good as a 610. Like you said, apples and oranges.
 

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It seems that the reissue of the Mustang has reduced the market value of the originals.

Wrong forum, I know, but it does speak to the subject of the thread.
 

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From the Collectors point of view, No I don't think Boxed versions of the old revolvers will have a price change.

The Unboxed, Worn Old Shooters, Yes I think it will have a effect on that part of the market.

New Stainless 38 Special Snub nose with a sweet trigger and a Pony on the Side for 699 dollars.

Yes I Think it will affect the market for buyers looking to shoot there revolvers.
If the old shooters are priced to high, they will just buy the new one.

(I Did that very thing )

 

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Do values go down when old models are "brought out of the archives"?

Did the Gen3 SAAs lower values of the Gen1s? I'm not so sure a new version, even a direct copy, typically affects the collectibility of the original models.
But they do satisfy many of the potential buyers which reduces potential bidders at auction sites, which may reduce overall bid prices.

Unlike 1980, today’s real values on guns are based more on online auction sells than by pricing guides.

Many guns are worth a lot because there are no options but to buy old. When other options spring up, some of the bidders go that way. Fewer bidders equals lower demand and less competition for a set number of old builds. That means lower prices.

There are people that bought a Python that would gladly have paid half the price for a new version (if it looked and worked about as good as the old ones). That wasn’t an option, so they were forced to pay hugely inflated prices for the old ones.

With an option to buy new, the inflation becomes a. It of a bubble.
 
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