Colt Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Actually it is a SF-VI and what a mouthfull to actually say! I just got it and thought the cylinder is sure loose at full lockup. With endshake. But I compare to some old design Colts that are like vault doors at lockup.

So this one shoots groups that are 4 to 7 inches to the left, at 45 feet. It varied a little since I had not the best sights, not the best range lighting, and not the best eyes!

Can the looseness of the cylinder account for the groups being to the left? Thanks.

Bart Noir
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,906 Posts
Check the barrel to be sure it's screwed in ALL the way, and the front sight is at 12:00.

For some reason, starting soon after the introduction of the shrouded barrel in 1972, Colt just could NOT seem to get the barrels screwed in and indexed properly.

The "usual" was for the front sight to be just slightly off toward the 1:00 position by a couple of degrees.

This makes the gun shoot to the left.

I don't know how many of these I saw over the years, but after a while it started to seem as though they ALL were off.

Your SF-VI will NOT lock up tightly like the older Colt's.

These later guns have an action like that used on all other DA revolvers.
That is, the cylinder is deliberately allowed to be loose, so the chamber will align itself with the bore.
So, there will be some looseness in the cylinder at the moment of ignition.

As for end-shake, it's possible your gun's cylinder has "seated", or worn-in.
This is not too uncommon with the smaller Colt's.

My advice is to send the gun back to Colt, to have the barrel properly indexed, and complain about the end shake at the same time.
Likely, Colt will correct the problems at no charge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
I agree with dfariswheel. Send it to Colt. I had a problem with a Magnum Carry, bought NIB in `98. It shot a pattern instead of a group. I wrote to Colt and the response was "send it back and we'll fix it". I did and they did.

It now shoots almost as well as my Smith 649 which is the most accurate snub I've ever owned,

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
I recently purchased an "as new", probably unfired Colt DS, mgf in 1982 (I think, serial # in 40,000's).

It shoots left and high. Not dramatically so, but enough it bothers me. I have 2 older Colt Cobra's, 2 S/W J-frames and they DON'T print high/left. In fact I shot all of the revolvers the day I first shot the DS and the DS was the only one with the left/high problem.

Think I should contact Colt about sending it back for correction? How much do you think the postage/Colt service fee would be? The only Colt website I could find was a LEO/Military/Private Security site. What is the correct address for Colt Customer Service/Repairs?

Thanks.

[This message has been edited by Laserlips (edited 04-24-2005).]
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,906 Posts
Colt's new commercial web site is: http://www.coltsmfg.com

I don't know what Colt would charge these days to correct the targeting of your Detective Special.

To align the windage, they'll likely turn the barrel and possible reset the barrel/cylinder gap, if needed.

Elevation is done by actually stretching the front sight.
A special hydraulic tool it used to impress a long "dent" into the front sight ramp, stretching it higher, and lowering the point of impact.

This is usually not noticeable, and works well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,483 Posts
laser lips et al; Once you get the front sight centered,the front sight will be higher,and should thus lower the impact point,like you want. Look at a clock face: Isn't 12 at a higher elevation than 11 or 1?

Bud
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by lonewolf:
laser lips et al; Once you get the front sight centered,the front sight will be higher,and should thus lower the impact point,like you want. Look at a clock face: Isn't 12 at a higher elevation than 11 or 1?

Bud
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sounds like both my problems might be addressed by centering the barrel?
Thanks..
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,906 Posts
BE WARY of local 'smith's.

Often they DO NOT have the Colt-specific action wrench and the barrel vise inserts.

What too many will do is use some kind of "expedient" tooling and this is RISKY in the extreme.

I've seen a fair number of good revolvers damaged or destroyed by this kind of "make do" gunsmithing.

Another thing to consider, is that too many local 'smiths will just turn the barrel in and call it done.

The problems is, Colt barrels are torqued against the frame, and in most cases, simply turning it further in will cause "bore compression".
This is an actual crushing and restriction of the bore caused by too much torque.

This leaves a "tight spot" in the rear of the barrel, and accuracy is gone for good.

The correct method is to turn the barrel OUT slightly, THEN back in.

Bottom line is, make SURE your local 'smith has the RIGHT tooling, and knows HOW to use it.
In my experience, trusting local gunsmiths with a Colt is a crap shoot....with loaded dice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Is this something that was common for Detective Specials. I just picked up one that looks NIB and was made in 1974 according to proofhouse. Now you have me worried since I have not shot it yet that it will be "out of whack". Was there a S/N range or year made that this was attributed to? or is this too a crap shoot as to who has one that is inaccurate and one that is not?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
This is a problem that can happen to anyone's revolver, adjustable or fixed sighted guns. It's not a matter of the revolver being inaccurate, just not shooting to the POA. It will still shoot good groups.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,906 Posts
It isn't a matter of lack of accuracy, it's a matter of the gun grouping off target.

I had one Detective Special in for this, and shot it off the sand bags to see what was what.

I fired 6 shots and got ONE hit about 9 inches to the left.

Taking a closer look, I found SIX shots in a circle I could cover with a quarter.

Re-indexing the barrel put them dead center.

I showed the targets to the owner, and as far as I know he still has it, and has threatened death to any of his kids who tries to take it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dfariswheel:
Colt's new commercial web site is: http://www.coltsmfg.com

I don't know what Colt would charge these days to correct the targeting of your Detective Special.

To align the windage, they'll likely turn the barrel and possible reset the barrel/cylinder gap, if needed.

Elevation is done by actually stretching the front sight.
A special hydraulic tool it used to impress a long "dent" into the front sight ramp, stretching it higher, and lowering the point of impact.

This is usually not noticeable, and works well.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks for the info.. I'm not worried about the slight elevation problem as I was shooting at a relatively short distance, and I can adjust for that, but the left of center impact did bug me. I wonder if a local gunsmith can correct the indexing problem. I'll give my local gs a call Monday and see what he thinks. I hate to send a firearm thru the mails anyplace as it's expensive, and I've had the bad experience of having someone at UPS "liberate" a pistol while in transit several years ago. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dfariswheel:
BE WARY of local 'smith's.

Often they DO NOT have the Colt-specific action wrench and the barrel vise inserts.

What too many will do is use some kind of "expedient" tooling and this is RISKY in the extreme.

I've seen a fair number of good revolvers damaged or destroyed by this kind of "make do" gunsmithing.

Another thing to consider, is that too many local 'smiths will just turn the barrel in and call it done.

The problems is, Colt barrels are torqued against the frame, and in most cases, simply turning it further in will cause "bore compression".
This is an actual crushing and restriction of the bore caused by too much torque.

This leaves a "tight spot" in the rear of the barrel, and accuracy is gone for good.

The correct method is to turn the barrel OUT slightly, THEN back in.

Bottom line is, make SURE your local 'smith has the RIGHT tooling, and knows HOW to use it.
In my experience, trusting local gunsmiths with a Colt is a crap shoot....with loaded dice.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Thanks for the "heads-up". Looks like my 2 options now are to: 1. Send it back to Colt, paying expensive shipping both ways, plus whatever fee Colt charges for the correction. 2. Use "Kentucky Windage" in the future. I think probably answer behind door number 2 will win out. I had wanted to use the sweet DS as a concealed carry option, but guess when I want to carry a snub my CT equipped S/W J-Frame model 638 will still have that slot. (S/W, blasphemy?)

But I love the DS way too much to chance someone screwing it up.

Best Wishes and Thanks..

JP
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top