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Discussion Starter #1
It's me with my 6" .357 artillery piece, again ... Will this fit in a GI type shoulder holster? How about a GI style full-flap something-or-other? Concealed carry is out of the question ... It'd be like trying to hide a cue stick on a midget. But, I would like something for field-carry. AND, a 25 cent Confederate War Bond to anyone that can tell me about the holster of the cop on the old Adam 12 TV show. The whole side swings open and the gun's right in your hand! I'd trade an autographed 8 x 10 glossy of Gene Autrey for one of those! (No, guys, I don't really have one to trade ... I just said, "I WOULD."
 

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A GI shoulder or hip holster won't fit a revolver, especially a 6" barreled one.

Most holster makers offer a variety of "field" holsters, including full-flapped models. Check out offerings from Bianchi and El Paso Saddlery.

The holster on "Adam 12" was a "clam shell" holster.
These had some popularity from about the late 20's to the 60's.
The holster is actually a leather covered metal shell, hinged along the back side.
The front shell is spring loaded, with a release button located inside the area of the gun's trigger guard.

To use, you grip the gun, put your trigger finger inside the gun's trigger guard, and press the button.
The spring loaded front shell snaps open and you simply lift the gun out of the back shell.

These fell from favor for a variety of reasons.
One was, it was possible for the release to get damaged or fouled, and fail to open the holster.

Another was the possibility of the catch getting worn or fouled and allowing the holster to pop open on it's own, dumping the gun on the ground.

Re-holstering was somewhat touchy also. You needed to carefully place the gun into the formed rear shell where it was supposed to stay put until you closed the front shell.

If you weren't careful, the gun would fall "off" the formed shell before you could close the front shell, again, dumping the gun.

The clam shell was snatch resistant, but ONLY if you tried to draw the gun upward. Most of them would open if the gun was grabbed and pulled sideways.

A final problem was the fact that during the draw you had your finger on the gun's trigger, and this was no longer considered a safe practice.

The "last hurrah" of the clam shell design was in the late 60's with limited use by the LAPD. About this time, the police world changed and the clam shell fell by the wayside.

The last time I saw a new clam shell holster for sale was in the very early 70's.

Another idea that just didn't stand the test of time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ah, Dr. Wheel ... great to hear from you! Thanks, again, for your information. I've been looking at El Paso holsters - nice, huh? SO, WHO WAS YOUR TRIVIA GUY!?!?! I can't go home and study more. I JUST DON'T KNOW!QUOTE]Originally posted by dfariswheel:
A GI shoulder or hip holster won't fit a revolver, especially a 6" barreled one.

Most holster makers offer a variety of "field" holsters, including full-flapped models. Check out offerings from Bianchi and El Paso Saddlery.

The holster on "Adam 12" was a "clam shell" holster.
These had some popularity from about the late 20's to the 60's.
The holster is actually a leather covered metal shell, hinged along the back side.
The front shell is spring loaded, with a release button located inside the area of the gun's trigger guard.

To use, you grip the gun, put your trigger finger inside the gun's trigger guard, and press the button.
The spring loaded front shell snaps open and you simply lift the gun out of the back shell.

These fell from favor for a variety of reasons.
One was, it was possible for the release to get damaged or fouled, and fail to open the holster.

Another was the possibility of the catch getting worn or fouled and allowing the holster to pop open on it's own, dumping the gun on the ground.

Re-holstering was somewhat touchy also. You needed to carefully place the gun into the formed rear shell where it was supposed to stay put until you closed the front shell.

If you weren't careful, the gun would fall "off" the formed shell before you could close the front shell, again, dumping the gun.

The clam shell was snatch resistant, but ONLY if you tried to draw the gun upward. Most of them would open if the gun was grabbed and pulled sideways.

A final problem was the fact that during the draw you had your finger on the gun's trigger, and this was no longer considered a safe practice.

The "last hurrah" of the clam shell design was in the late 60's with limited use by the LAPD. About this time, the police world changed and the clam shell fell by the wayside.

The last time I saw a new clam shell holster for sale was in the very early 70's.

Another idea that just didn't stand the test of time.
[/QUOTE]
 

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El Paso Saddlery makes a shoulder holster I like for non-concealed carry; I can't remember the name - the 1945, 1911, or "tanker" model - you'll know it when you see it in their online catalogue. Just one strap you loop over your neck like a mail carriers bag, for want of a better description. I think they first started making them in WW II for servicemen in tanks. I had one made for my 7 & 1/2" Colt New Frontier, and I like it very much.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes! You read my mind - and the EPS catalogue! That's why I asked about the GI, because that's just what it looks like, doesn't it? Glad you like yours. Tell me, Bullet Bob, about your NF. That's another gun high on my Most Wanted list. <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Bullet Bob:
El Paso Saddlery makes a shoulder holster I like for non-concealed carry; I can't remember the name - the 1945, 1911, or "tanker" model - you'll know it when you see it in their online catalogue. Just one strap you loop over your neck like a mail carriers bag, for want of a better description. I think they first started making them in WW II for servicemen in tanks. I had one made for my 7 & 1/2" Colt New Frontier, and I like it very much.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 

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My Colt Model 1901 version of the 1892 service revolver fits a military flap holster for the SAA. It is a calvery draw reproduction for the SAA and Schofield. I imagine the holster for the 1917 revolvers would fit as well. I am not sure about the barrel length though. I think ElPaso Saddlery could fix you up with one just fine.


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Memory grows dim, Dimmit!

The "Adam 12" holster was a new production of the old Audley clamshell holster. It was being produced by some Native American business concern - - The Jicarilla Apaches, perhaps? I read somewhere that LAPD did a big procurement of these in the mid-1960s as part of some "Spend Money with Minority Businesses" program. I was kind of fascinated with the holster until I inspected a couple of them. Undesirable for the reasons mentioned above, sure, but superbly crafted, an interface of leather work and mechanical stuff.
NOT something I wanted to wear, even exposed.

Yes, El Paso Saddlery offers their rendition of the M3 military shoulder holster. This is the one which is worn with a simple strap from right shoulder, across the chest, with holster beneath left arm. Very practical way to keep a 1911 (and later a mid frame revolver) out of the way, getting in and out of vehicles and aircraft. Some personnel complained of it pinching a nerve atop the right colorbone, though. Later version was called the M7, which hangs from left shoulder, with a stabilizxing strap running around the chest, and is furnished with a leather pad. More comfortable but also far more complicated to don and to adjust, not to mention heavier and more expensive to manufacture. (Still not as heavy as web pistol belt with 1916 flap holster, though.)

The EPS version is very nice. They'll make it up for almost any handgun, for L or R hand use, and with full leather lining. Not cheap, but excellent leather and workmanship, at least rior to Bobby's McNellis's passing. (RIP Bobby.
)

EPS also does a line of reproductions of various military hip holsters for both autos and revolvers. Beautiful work!

Best,
Johnny
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I thank you for sharing your knowledge with us, Sir! I think you could just pick a subject and start talking and I'd like to hear what you say! Thanks again. <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Johnny Guest:
Memory grows dim, Dimmit!

The "Adam 12" holster was a new production of the old Audley clamshell holster. It was being produced by some Native American business concern - - The Jicarilla Apaches, perhaps? I read somewhere that LAPD did a big procurement of these in the mid-1960s as part of some "Spend Money with Minority Businesses" program. I was kind of fascinated with the holster until I inspected a couple of them. Undesirable for the reasons mentioned above, sure, but superbly crafted, an interface of leather work and mechanical stuff.
NOT something I wanted to wear, even exposed.

Yes, El Paso Saddlery offers their rendition of the M3 military shoulder holster. This is the one which is worn with a simple strap from right shoulder, across the chest, with holster beneath left arm. Very practical way to keep a 1911 (and later a mid frame revolver) out of the way, getting in and out of vehicles and aircraft. Some personnel complained of it pinching a nerve atop the right colorbone, though. Later version was called the M7, which hangs from left shoulder, with a stabilizxing strap running around the chest, and is furnished with a leather pad. More comfortable but also far more complicated to don and to adjust, not to mention heavier and more expensive to manufacture. (Still not as heavy as web pistol belt with 1916 flap holster, though.)

The EPS version is very nice. They'll make it up for almost any handgun, for L or R hand use, and with full leather lining. Not cheap, but excellent leather and workmanship, at least rior to Bobby's McNellis's passing. (RIP Bobby.
)

EPS also does a line of reproductions of various military hip holsters for both autos and revolvers. Beautiful work!

Best,
Johnny
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 
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