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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at an early Model 1851, made in 1852. All looks correct except the wedge isn't numbered.
Would that be correct for an early model? Did Colt always number the wedge or was that a later change. Just curious.
 

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The wedges were numbered to the revolver as manufactured by Colt, but due to rough use they were sometimes damaged or lost. I imagine gunsmiths back in those days carried spare parts like this that were susceptible to being damaged or lost. This particular part would not have had a number stamped as supplied by Colt.

Randy
 

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Colt wedges were always numbered to the gun. However, as you can imagine, during the gun's period of use, wedges could wear out, break, or get lost, and when this happened, the gun owner put in a wedge from another gun (so the wedge will have a different number) or just put in a replacement, un-numbered wedge. Personally, I dislike guns that have mis-numbered or plain wedges, but that's because I'm not an easy-going person... :giggle:

However, if the gun is great, I'll still buy it, but I'll demand a discount. When you own a gun that has a mis-numbered or un-numbered wedge, you lose the right to say the gun is "all matching"... Not a huge deal, but some purists will fret, and others will demand a discount. Unless the gun "sings" to you, I'd say try to find another.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The reason I ask is that I have read that the late production of Model 1849's did not have serial numbers on the loading lever or wedge, and Wilson indicates that very early 1848's were not stamped on the wedge or loading lever lug. Can't find any mention of wedge numbering on the 1851's in the 1851 book.
 

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Replaced wedges are so common that, to me personally, it is of ZERO consequence if every other number matches. But again, not everybody is like me (thank goodness!!!) so for a resale later it may matter to someone else.
 

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The reason I ask is that I have read that the late production of Model 1849's did not have serial numbers on the loading lever or wedge, and Wilson indicates that very early 1848's were not stamped on the wedge or loading lever lug. Can't find any mention of wedge numbering on the 1851's in the 1851 book.
I don't recall reading a reference suggesting late '51 Navies had un-numbered wedges, so it would be interesting if someone could come up with a reference note suggesting this. However, I can already tell you that if you read Pate's book, he says that late production '60 Armies sometimes had un-numbered wedges.
 

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Just FYI, this Model 1851 manufactured late 1851/early 1852 does have the correctly numbered wedge, however, I also would not pass up a nice Navy just for an no number, or wrong numbered, wedge.
706814
 

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I should know this, but what years were the Squarebacks made ?
According to Colt's s/n look-up #2xx was mfgr'd in 1850 and the other two (27xx & 36xx) in 1851. I believe they produced these beginning in later 1850 and continued through 1851 when the Army Ord Officer who specified this TG style was replaced. Colt never liked it due to the extra cost. Less than 4000 were manufactured.

Randy
 

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I should know this, but what years were the Squarebacks made ?
They were only found on the 1st and 2nd Model Navies (the 2nd Model being more rare). The various 3rd and 4th Models all had round trigger guards.

... when the Army Ord Officer who specified this TG style was replaced. Colt never liked it due to the extra cost. Less than 4000 were manufactured.
The US Army Ordnance Officer was a Colonel Talcot, a holdover from the Mexican War. Colt wanted an Army contract for his Navies, so as to gain favor with Talcot he went with the SB TG, like the 1848 Pocket and the 1848 WF, 1st, and 2nd Model Dragoons. The reason for his replacement was that he was courts-martialed (Swayze, p.29), and from then on both the 1851 Navy and the 1848 Dragoon had the round TG.

I can't help you with your addiction as I "suffer" from it, also. My addiction is less expensive than yours, however, as I can't afford the real deal:



Regards,

Jim
 

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They were only found on the 1st and 2nd Model Navies (the 2nd Model being more rare). The various 3rd and 4th Models all had round trigger guards.



The US Army Ordnance Officer was a Colonel Talcot, a holdover from the Mexican War. Colt wanted an Army contract for his Navies, so as to gain favor with Talcot he went with the SB TG, like the 1848 Pocket and the 1848 WF, 1st, and 2nd Model Dragoons. The reason for his replacement was that he was courts-martialed (Swayze, p.29), and from then on both the 1851 Navy and the 1848 Dragoon had the round TG.

I can't help you with your addiction as I "suffer" from it, also. My addiction is less expensive than yours, however, as I can't afford the real deal:



Regards,

Jim
Very nice revolvers Jim! Best John
 
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