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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All, I have a question regarding early (pre 1900) New Services. Are these more desirable and or collectible than the later models? I just hardly ever see one for sale anywhere. Or is there just not that many left? Thanks for any input!
 

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I think it's simply harder to find the older ones in excellent shape. But if you do, I'm pretty sure there will be a pretty high price attached to it.
 

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In old collectible guns condition & rarity are usually the important factors. The New Service dates from 1899 so only one pre 1900 year when few were made. This is a 1902 & one in same condition from 1899 might be worth twice as much. Early years and low serial numbers are important to some collectors ----



The early ones had a firing pin integral with the hammer and lacked positive restraint of hammer-down firing by accident. About 1909 the firing pin was installed as a separate part on the hammer & internal changes installed a positive hammer-down block device, plus simplifying its cylinder rotation lock system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Guys thanks for the replies. Any ideas when Colt started putting the "bulge" in the barrel right before the barrel mates to the frame?
 

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The bolstered barrel first appears on the US Army Model 1917 and continues on commercial models after WWI.
 

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A pre 1900 New Service in good+ condition will always bring more than a later one as they are seldom encountered.
 

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If you want to use the gun as a shooter, be aware that any New Service made before approximately 1909 did not have an internal safety. Guns without such a safety are more likely to fire if dropped or knocked around.
 

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And if you do intend to fire it, the early NS (called the Old Model) has a more complex action, and spare parts for repairs, along with people that can repair it, are quite scarce. In other words, don't shoot it.

Buck
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the help guys. Haggis, just to clarify a little bit, what about the early New Service makes it have a more complex action? From what I have read the only thing I have seen is the very early models use a leaf spring instead of a coil for the bolt spring. Is there a different rebound lever design, etc? Im really enjoying learning about these!
 

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I just finished overhaul of a 1904 early NS and recall a few differences. First is the absence of the mechanism that prevents the hammer from reaching the primer until the trigger is back as in SA or DA firing position. Previously mentioned is the flat bolt spring. Another is a pivoting piece on the rebound lever interface with the bolt. There is a physical difference between the early crane and the later, same basic design but won't interchange. The 1909 internal changes seems to have set the stage until and after the 1917, altho the 1909 cylinder is a few thousanths longer than the 1917 frame altho the cranes interchange. I have several New Services 1902 to 1921 & have done internal work on four, on which I base this info. I'm pretty sure of it but it is not comprehensive. There may be differences I have not encountered.

This is the aforementioned 1904 ----


This barrel is from a .44 Mag German made blank. Grips are barkless stag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Rhmc, that 04 looks awesome, you must be quite the craftsman. Thanks for the input, a lot of my questions have been answered.
 
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