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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
One of my items on my "bucket list" was to look at the evolution of speed loaders for revolvers. I have examined patents that have been applied for and received and have copies of said patents for review and comparison. Next was to obtain actual working examples...a little tough to say the least.

However the earliest most survivable example(s) I have obtained were these first applied for by J.M. Hunt in April of 1956. The were granted a US Patent, #US2896353 in July of 1959 but were not in Wide spread use until the mid 1960's following the Watt's Riots of 1965 by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department and subsequently other California agencies. These were first mass produced by Pachmayr of Los Angeles.

They were widely accepted and used by both Law Enforcement personnel who carried Colt and Smith & Wesson's Revolvers because one set could be used for any frame size by inserting your finger into the center of the top of the Speed Loader and pulling the sides which would cause the bullets the spread to allow access and chambering into Colt Python's and S&W N Frames.

Most Agencies were issuing "K" Frames S&W during the 1960's so having having a speed loader that would aide any officer was looked on with great favor. UNFORTUNATELY the California Highway Patrol was one of the Last Agencies to adopt the use of the Speed Loader.

Anyway I thought y'all might like to see what they looked liked. Picture one shows the US Patent drawing along with 3 of the surviving speed loaders. Picture 2 shows standard spread for a "K" Frame S&W and Picture Three shows the expanded spread that would accommodate Colt Pythons or the "N" Frames as noted earlier.

PS..I might add they work perfect on Detective Specials as well !:D
 

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Simple yet effective ! It seems that they would still be desireable today. Neat stuff, thanks for sharing Kid.
 

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Kid,

You might want to look at your copy of Haven and Belden (p.415 in my copy, p.405 in others, probably others depending on version). This describes a speedloader for the Colt New Navy from a magazine that appeared on August 22, 1889. There's also a page in the 1890 Colt catalog that is on p.421 in my copy. That page says the device was patented in the U.S. and England on April 30, 1889.

There was also the Prideaux loader that was used with early Webley/Enfield top-breaks that was roughly contemporaneous with the Colt.

http://www.utting.org/writing/nvtu/shooting/prideaux-loader.pdf

A bit more data for you to chomp on,

Buck
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Kid,

You might want to look at your copy of Haven and Belden (p.415 in my copy, p.405 in others, probably others depending on version). This describes a speedloader for the Colt New Navy from a magazine that appeared on August 22, 1889. There's also a page in the 1890 Colt catalog that is on p.421 in my copy. That page says the device was patented in the U.S. and England on April 30, 1889.

There was also the Prideaux loader that was used with early Webley/Enfield top-breaks that was roughly contemporaneous with the Colt.

http://www.utting.org/writing/nvtu/shooting/prideaux-loader.pdf

A bit more data for you to chomp on,

Buck
Yeah I have a bunch of resources but few working examples in hand..LOL
 

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What fun!


I like that little Black Rubber "Chair Leg Glide-Cup' Speedloader. You could have put those on my Mom's Steel Leg Ironing Board and they would have worked prefectly!


I have never seen one of those before...very interesting..!


The 'Prideaux' is really nice! Wow...seen drawings of them before but never seen one in real Life.


I have an old oddball Speedloader laying around here somewhere...if I can find it, I will snap a pic.

Oh, wait, I have an image of it I can post...

Here -


 

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Discussion Starter #7
Oyeboten, I haven't seen that one before. Do you havew more views ?

Not to hijack my own thread...LOL...Okay I am..

Here is a patent that worries me some. Please read all the accompanying support. Patent issued November 24, 2009.

This Claim.."Accordingly, the use of this invention will make the entire world a safer place" almost gagged me.:p

Patent US7621062 - Bullet identification and tracking device - Google Patents
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yes I have seen those...I thought I had a copy of the patent...I believe those to be a 1970's Idea. Still looking for examples prior to 1960's.

Several intriguing ideas from the 1920's and 1930's.
 

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MVC-793S.JPG MVC-794S.JPG MVC-795S.JPG MVC-796S.JPG MVC-797S.JPG


Here ye go -


This one is for the Smith & Wesson K-Frame Revolvers.

I imagine the Company also made them for the various Colts and N-Frame S&Ws also.


Handle says "REVOLVER CARTRIDGE CLIP CORP. NEW YORK" ( and then in tiny figures ) "38" ( Quotes by me ).

B Side says "Pat. Pend." ( and then a very very tiny character which looks like a Pyramid ).


There does not seem to be anything for info on these on the internet.

Body is a Nickel Plated Die Casting or possibly Nickel Plated Cast Brass, and, the 'clip' elements appear to be Blued Spring Steel, held in with Slot Head Screws.

It would not surprise me if these dated from the 1930s anyway.
 

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Here's a speed loader idea I'll bet very few of u have ever heard of much less seen,back in the late 50's & early 60's a few of us actually shot combat w/SA's,that's what it was called before it was IPSC,we'd elongate a base pin so that when it was pulled from the frame it couldn't come all the way out,just enough to release the cyl.-When we had to reload we'd pull the base pin, open the loading gate & the cyl would fall out & we'd have another cyl.already loaded,drop the cyl in,push the base pin in & continue shooting.Yes it was hard on the cyls. but back then a colt cyl. only cost $13.33.I shot the Mexican defense & the PPC many times w/a SA.
 

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That's a nice idea Jim!


The old Remington Cap & Ball Revolvers allowed that move also, and or were favored for it.
 

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Oye,

There's a modern all-rubber speedloader that looks a lot like the one you show. The main similarity is the staggered cartridge arrangement. I can't remember the name of it, but it doesn't have a good reputation among action shooters today. It's best called a "slowloader" because of difficulty in getting the cartridges to release. Your older one has a release lever that fixes that problem - the new one requires you to twist the rims out of the holder much like a speed strip.

Added: The newer rubber one is called a Maxfire.
http://www.speedloaders.com/

Buck
 

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Hi haggis,


The Ring Handle on the one I have is just a Handle, and, though the whole thing divides and hinges in the middle ( for reasons I do not really understand ), the Cartridges 'release' by having them far enough in to the Cylinder chambers, and, pulling the 'Clip' unit hard enough for the Cartridge Heads to come out of the little Steel spring-retention clips that hold them. You gotta pull HARD, too, to do this!

It really seems very awkward to me, and, their being staggered does not help!

I am surprised that the design seen in the "HKS" type Speedloaders was not being offered many decades earlier - it seems the most direct and practical and and forthright and uncomplicated and easy and trouble free and requires no 'force'.

Possibly, the staggered arrangement was to appease the conflict of conditions where only two rounds were needed to be added? Or..? I don't know.

'Tactical Re-Loads' maybe took a while to catch on conceptually...vis a vie, just re-loading the two or three rounds otherwise fired or spent.
 

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I've attached a link to Carl Ehbets' 1889 patent US402424 that covers the Colt "cartridge pack". You can download a PDF version from the website.

Patent US402424 - EHBETS - Google Patents

Buck

Wow~! That is brilliant!

I wonder if it ever was produced?


When I was making Pistol Cases in the old Styles, one of my earliest commissions was to make a period-looking Gentleman's Drawing Room Case for a Colt Model 1900, which had ben presented By Colt's to Mr. Ehbets.

He had a lot of Patents, many of which were assigned to Colt.
 

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A cartridge pack based on this patent was provided by Colt to the U.S. Navy as part of the 1889 New Navy contract. Some reference materials say that many thousands were made. Examples are very hard to find these days. The leather cartridge pack holders are relatively expensive but appear to be a lot more common that the packs themselves. I found one ad for the wooden center pin for which the owner wanted about $300, and that didn't include the outer metal ring.

I have a PDF which I excerpted from the 1889 Proceedings of the United States Naval Institute, Volume XV, that discusses Colt's cartridge pack. I can't post it on the Forum, since uploading that type of file is forbidden (the S&W Forum allows uploading several types of files, so I suspect it could be done here with a few settings changes by the Administrators). PM me your email address, and I'll email you a copy, if you wish (it's about 1.2MB).

I don't know anybody that has one of these cartridge packs, but I'd bet that Bob Best either has one, or knows somebody that does.

Buck
 
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