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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a .45 SAA serial number 21379 (manufactured in 1875) which hasn't any martial markings, though probably a civilian model. However, what puzzles me is the fact that in his Guide To Antique American Firearms, Flayderman makes no mention of civilian SAA's under serial 24000. He mentions only 'early martially marked models' under this number.

Can you please tell me what you think of this oddness ?

Colt SAA gauche.jpg Colt SAA droit.jpg
 

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The first 176 SAAs were civilian. Up to serial # 3732, 467 civilian SAAs were made. (Graham Kopec More, "The Study....")
 

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There were many Civilian models produced under 24,000. I am traveling for work and cannot access resource materials, but this fact is indeed true. Yours probably has an italic barrel address as this was phased out around serial number 22,000.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

No worries, just a bad resource book. Nice old civilian SAA. Has it had any work done on it?
Trigger and hammer replaced possibly? If so and if you still have the originals, they can be fixed which will raise the value of your gun substantially.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First, thanks for your welcome.

I confirm that my SAA has an italic barrel address. All the parts are original (even the cylinder has a serial number). The gun has seen a lot of use, judging by the wear of the grips and the blackpowder burns on the frame in front of the chambers, but these and the inside of the barrel are very clean without almost any spot. The cylinder play is minimal. Its owner(s) must have taken good care of this SAA !
 

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According to Cochran's "Colt Peacemaker Encyclopedia" there was an economic depression between 1873 to 1878. That may be why not so many commercial SAA's were sold. He states that in 1880, Colt wrote to the US Government to offer to sell them 1000 extra SAA's they had in stock. On January 5, 1880 Colt signed a contract with the Government to deliver 2000 SAA's. Colt delivered 1000 SAA's to the Government on March 29, 1880 and another 1000 on May 28, 1880. Some of these were the Civilian SAA's that Colt had in inventory and since they already had a case hardened frame, the inspector's initials were missing as the metal was too hard to receive a stamp/die.
 

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Additional information on the depression that may have caused low sells of SAA's to the civilian population between 1873-1880.

During the 1870s, a major economic depression spread to the United States of America from Europe. This depression, also known as the Long Depression, started in 1873 and ended in 1879. It was caused by the collapse of the Vienna Stock Exchange (Austria) and caused people to panic across most of Europe.
 

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The trigger looks to thick to be a first generation and the hammer looks incorrect as well. A picture of the knurling and we would be able to tell a lot more about the hammer. To me and it may be just me, the front sight looks a bit off. These two parts are often replaced as they are easily damaged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The trigger looks to thick to be a first generation and the hammer looks incorrect as well. A picture of the knurling and we would be able to tell a lot more about the hammer. To me and it may be just me, the front sight looks a bit off. These two parts are often replaced as they are easily damaged.
Here are pictures of the trigger, hammer and front sight. I think this sight has just been filed.
Beside that, I just noted that my gun, serial 21379, is listed in Guy Sager's thread “Known Survivor Files” /// Historical Serial records for Colts Target Revolvers

_IGP3366.jpg _IGP3367.jpg _IGP3368.jpg _IGP3370.jpg _IGP3371.jpg
 

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1907 hammer, fat trigger OK for that period, started in the 16xxx range. This fact known due to former ownership of #16638, a factory museum piece "liberated" in the late 1970s that had been a tool room sample. Sample had fire blue screws and trigger and was not a second or third gen trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks, Hondo44, though I'm disappointed to see that the hammer of my 1875 SAA has been replaced with a 1905-1908 period one...
 
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