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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)

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You are painting with a rather large brush.
Wayyyyy too much going on with both.

You should really spend some time in the SAA stickies.

Take a browse through the Single Action Photo thread. There's hundreds to peruse and just about all of them are righteous.

You can't learn how to do something in two pictures that literally takes years of looking at and holding SAAs.
Sorry.
:-(
 

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Charles,

For every different brand/model of old gun one considers buying, they should buy a book 1st! For 1st generation Colts especially! They are the most faked, abused, or 'bubbad up' with mixed parts.

You can learn a lot, but it'll take too long to learn enough on this forum, homework is essential.

Those two are both 1st gens. The least expensive and most informative for the novice is Colt Peacemaker Yearly Variations by Keith Cochran, just under $20.

The 44:
Seller doesn't indicate which 44 cartridge it is; 44 S&W Special or 44-40 Winchester.
None of the photos show the serial #s or assembly #s and the seller doesn't indicate if they all match, although most parts look original.
The grips are replaced with the wrong vintage, a 1906 should not have eagles on the grips and they may even be reproductions instead of Colt grips.
The home made cyl pin is obvious to the most casual observer, of course and that's the easy stuff to spot.
Clearly the hammer is cocked on the safety notch by the position of the trigger and hammer. Seller says it works as it should but that's a pretty general statement and matter of opinion. Maybe seller knows how to tell if the hammer notches and sear are sound, maybe he doesn't. They'll all go click, click, click, but doesn't mean they function properly.

The 38:
Parts look original except grips obviously replaced.
Seller doesn't indicate if serial #s and assembly #s match or not.
Replaced cyl pin and pin latch.
The barrel has a long barrel address on top so clearly has been shortened.
Improper front sight installation and replacement after cutting the barrel. Brazed on instead of milled in and soldered.
The ejector housing brazed to the barrel, screw is gone and likely because the hole for it in the barrel is stripped out.
The whole gun has been sanded and partially polished. Except in the cyl flutes.
Being one of 82 is no longer meaningful and contributes nothing to the value of this gun in it's condition and with a cut barrel.
No comments on how the action works but seller probably wouldn't know anyway.

Experience tells us that on these old guns, and with limited description and lack of multiple detailed photos, expect the worst.

Hope that helps,
Jim
 

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In my world, the 44 (it should be a "colt frontier six shooter") appears to be a semi decent brown gun. Put the proper $175 plain rubbers on it and a cylinder pin and you have a decent representative post 1900 brown single action for less than $1800 (at the starting bid) Not a bargain at the starting price currently.

The 357 may be a legit late production 357 magnum (originally first offered in 1935) but there's not much that can be one about that barrel and sight combo. Someone really used that one. On a true factory 357 mag the bottom side of the top strap wouldn't have the milled out fouling cut out like on the other calibers. Colt left it solid for added strength. It's just a shooter with not much collectors value because of the scarce caliber....a person would be better off buying a used 2nd or 3rd for the money.
 
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