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The revolver market in the '50's was REALLY competitive. Colt and S&W were in full swing, throwing bombs at each other every other year. So many great DA revolvers came from that decade. Of course the Python was the high water mark, but S&W gave us the model 19, 28, and 1955 target...such fantastic revolvers. They were at war, and WE were the winners!!
 

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I've been reading a reprint of the 1961 edition of Six Guns for the last two months. Most of what Elmer says remains valid, but he was certainly dead wrong about the future of revolvers vs. semiautomatic pistols, particularly the 9mm. Among other concerns, he considered pistol cases too difficult to reload. I will make allowances for Elmer because the technology has evolved greatly since his day. As for 1955 being a landmark year for firearms, I must agree; it was the year I was born. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I've been reading a reprint of the 1961 edition of Six Guns for the last two months. Most of what Elmer says remains valid, but he was certainly dead wrong about the future of revolvers vs. semiautomatic pistols, particularly the 9mm. Among other concerns, he considered pistol cases too difficult to reload. I will make allowances for Elmer because the technology has evolved greatly since his day. As for 1955 being a landmark year for firearms, I must agree; it was the year I was born. :)
Agreed. It is quite interesting to read him and Bill Jordan at that time. Both said that for serious work, one shouldn't consider an auto pistol....only a revolver. They downplay the 1911 as a gun better served for the military and that's it.

At that time though, auto pistols other than the 1911 weren't that common, and they weren't extremely reliable. And with the ammo of the day, I'm sure they weren't nearly as effective as a 357 mag or 44 special. Keith scoffs at 9mms of the day as little more than pop guns.
 

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Surprising, Keith liked the prewar and interwar Lugers for their feel, pointability, accuracy, and reliability, though he hated their triggers (who doesn't?) and their subpar ammo wound effect.
 

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The front lock wasn't and isn't needed because of the large rear lock and the fact that the cylinder turns into the frame. Others like S&W need the front lock because of a small rear lock and their cylinders turn away from the frame giving momentum to unlocking when being fired. The early K-frames had no front lock...that didn't last very long before one needed to be added.
Interesting, I have never thought of that. Good info!
 
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