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To save money I skipped the gunshow today and went to my favorite toy store to pick up my layaway. Well money saving just wasn't in the plans for me today. I found what may be a treat, but I need your expert advise on just what it really is.
The revolver is a Officer's Model in .38sp. The serial number is 6440XX which puts it at the end of the OMT (3rd issue) range. It has the walnut stocks and not the plastic stocks of the OMS (which started in 1949) that I have seen. It also has the adjustable front and adjustable rear sight of the OMT. The feature that stumps me is that it is single action. I know there was a rare single action OMM made, but did they also make a single action OMT?
Unfortunately by picking up my layaway I couldn't bring it home today (stupid 30 day law), but bright and early Monday I'm applying for the permit at the state police.
I'll post pics when I get it home, but who can tell me exactly what I have found?
 

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There are two "conversions" that turn up on Colt target revolvers fairly often.
A missing hammer block and it's linkage, and a single action conversion.

Many of the old time target shooter's believed that removing the safety block and it's linkage would improve the trigger pull.

Colt "had a baby" every time a gun modified like this was seen at the factory because the block was a critical safety feature.
Needless to say, this WASN'T a factory offered conversion .

The second modification, to single action was very popular, and Colt did offer it on most of the old target model revolvers.
Usually, the only way to determine if this was a factory job, is to get a Historical letter from Colt.

One factor still stands out among shooter's, and that's the "monkey see, monkey do" deal.

Because duffer shooters heard that a top match shooter had removed the safety or had a single action conversion, they JUST HAD to have the same, figuring that if it was good for the Big Boys, it had to be good for them.

For that reason, MOST of the single action conversions were non-factory kitchen table jobs. Happily, all that was necessary, was to remove the double action strut from the hammer, so they didn't butcher the gun.

The "monkey see" thing continues today in golf, shooting, cars, boats, etc.

Announce that Jerry Barnhart is smearing goose grease on his 1911 match gun, and by nightfall, there won't be a goose safe within the Continental US.

So, single action-only Colt target revolvers are fairly common. True factory conversions are rare.

For those of you who own a Colt target revolver, take a peak down the front of the hammer, and be sure there's a safety block present.



[This message has been edited by dfariswheel (edited 03-06-2004).]
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Dfariswheel. I never thought of just removing the double action strut. When I get it home I will open it up and take a look.
I just couldn't pass it by as it had just a little muzzle wear, the ever present turn line, and very good stocks for $400 OTD.
 

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Or cock the hammer(empty!) while looking at Page 353 of the "Book of Colt Firearms",and see the differences in the 2 O.M.s that Arnold Goodwin is holding w/ hammers cocked. In a nutshell,the short action doesnt go back as far in the frame. Bud
 

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That's what this revolver does RJ. If you pull the trigger the cylinder advances, but the hammer just barely moves (as if the hammer block is sliding up and down as it should). When cocked the hammer seems to go fully back like that of most DA revolvers.
It does have an excellent single action trigger the older Colts are known for. Now I can't wait to get it home to investigate further.

[This message has been edited by Majic (edited 03-07-2004).]
 

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greeting , there was a third type of single action conversion called the short action made by pachmeyer , king and others popularized them in the 30's and 40's. just pull the tigger with the gun emtpy ofcoarse and watch the cylinder revolve without the hammer cocking itself. I have not seen many at the gun show curcuit in the northeast but they are around ,
anoither was a colt conversion sold by Gil Hebard guns who had colt built them form him , i beleive hes still in buisness , email me when you post the pictures as i would like to see you new pride and joy , good luck rji
 
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