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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I included this in another thread, but I'm writing this up as a separately so that more Python Owners might read it.

I finally cleaned my 2020 4.25" Python a few hours ago. While doing so, I recollected a forum post wherein the writer noticed that all of the frame screws on his 2020 Python were fingernail loose, including the one under the grip panels. He suggested that the loose screws might be the cause of the hammer/cylinder malfunctions we've seen in various videos.

So, I took a fingernail and tried a screw. It was loose. I checked all of the other frame screws, including the one under the grip panels and they were ALL LOOSE.
I recounted earlier in another thread that the loose .050" Allen screw in the "Airsoft" rear sight assembly had caused horizontal stringing of the shots until it was diagnosed and secured; so during cleaning I checked the .050" Allen screw that secures the front sight blade and it was loose also.

To be clear, other than the issue with the rear sight's Allen screw, none of the loose screws caused any malfunctions whatsoever. However, I would suspect, malfunction or no malfunction, that getting a replacement frame screw or .050" Allen screw from Colt is going to be a huge PITA, given everything else that is going on.
I have some Cocobolo Hogue grips scheduled to arrive later today from Amazon. When I install them I'm going to go back and re-secure all of my frame screws with LocTite.

Do I still LOVE my 2020 Colt Python? You betcha absolutely. Just please check you screws so you don't get screwed.

Good luck with your new Pythons. I hope they all shoot as good as mine does.
 

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Good advice. I checked mine a couple of days ago and found the one under the grips to be a turn or two loose, as was the Allen screw in the sight. The one under the grip was also loose on my 2019 Cobra.

Thanks for the reminder about the one for the front sight. I've never had to worry about a front sight before...I just checked it and that one was tight, but it's not the last time I'll check it.
 

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Good advice to check on any revolvers, especially after shooting a lot of magnum loads. After shooting and during cleaning, I always check every screw on the gun.
 

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Good idea. I had the same issue with my Cobra: Not only was the sight screw loose, it was also thoroughly oiled to really make sure that it would fall out easily. :rolleyes: I don't know what they were thinking when they did that, but I cleaned it and put Loctite on it to make sure it stays put.
 

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I don't know why gun manufacturers do this. They basically soak their guns in oil before shipping them. Even the polymer pistols and rifles I've bought come this way. One of which even claimed that the gun only required a couple of drops of oil to operate.
 

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Checked mine...all are tight. I wonder whether Pythons returned to Colt for the redesigned transfer bar may not have had the screws properly torqued down in a rush to get them back to the distributors. Mine was made in mid-December so it was probably post-transfer bar replacement time period.

Just a guess on my part.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Just an update and yet another caution:


Earlier today I decided to take some time off from binge watching the Coronavirus Festivals on TV and dry fire my new Python to get used to the new custom slim Hogue Monogrip I received yesterday.

After unloading it, I went to close the cylinder and it wouldn't close. I've never had this happen before. Inspection revealed that the ejector star was protruding and hitting the side of the frame when closing. It was soon apparent that this was caused by the ejector rod becoming unscrewed inside the cylinder.
Re-screwing it fixed the problem and I was able to close the cylinder, but it took several turns of the ejector rod to screw it back in. It was pretty loose.

So, when you're checking you various 2020 Python screws for tightness, you can now add your ejector rod to the list. For a company that invented the revolver, they're sure having trouble with the basics.
 

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Just an update and yet another caution:

So, when you're checking you various 2020 Python screws for tightness, you can now add your ejector rod to the list. For a company that invented the revolver, they're sure having trouble with the basics.
Well, I had to go check...and mine was tight.

Just a few weeks ago though I bought a new to me 1968 Model 28-2 Smith and Wesson. Got it home and the cylinder wouldn't open. Finally got it and was about to take it back to the dealer when I noticed about a white band on the ejector rod. Screwed it back in and no problems since then.
 
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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Thank you everybody.

I heard an internet rumor that the next batch of Pythons to leave the factory will have extra stickers on the owners manual and the box that say SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED.

As to the ejector rod, I've been told that, while holding the ejector star in place, you can unscrew the ejector rod, clean the threads and then apply low strength LocTite.
I haven't tried it yet though. I bought some VC-3 a few weeks ago, so I'll use that.
 
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