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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I will take some more pics in a bit when I get better lighting, but for now these will have to do.

The pic below is of my great grandfather's 1903 .38WCF, and my great great grandfather's 1883 .44WCF between them is my 2012 .45 Colt.

Also included is a belt and holster I know nothing about that came with the .44WCF. I have looked for makers mark or leather worker name on it but haven't found anything. It needs some work, there is some dry rot present and the brass brads have corossion on them. There is also some green corossion present in a few of the bullet sleeves on the belt. The buckle is in good shape as is all the stitching, the leather just needs some good conditioning.

The horns I use for my hat rack in my office came from the lead steer on the WW White Ranch outside of Brady, Tx. It was the lead steer on the last cattle drive they sent up the Chisholm Trail in the early 1890s I believe. It was given to my great grandparents who were neighbors to the Whites as a house warming gift.

The branding Iron is one used by my grandfather that has his brand on it. We have never actually hot branded cattle as long as I have been around.

I have some Buffalo Arms black powder loads I will try in the guns. They both seem to be in perfect working order, all 4 clicks, no cracks or issues that I can find with function.

The one issue I have discovered is trying to get the cylinder bushing out of either of the two 1st gen guns is proving difficult. I sprayed some rem oil around them to try to soak in and loosen them but nothing yet.

Both guns have all matching serial numbers, though according to family history the barrel on the 38WCF has been shortened as it was originally a 7.5" gun. I will post more info about them with the better pics later. Including why the .38 doesn't have its factory stocks anymore.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, they were not the easiest to acquire. My grandaddy and great grandfather had acquired some nice colt SAAs in addition to these, including a very nice 1st gen C Engraved .44 that the last time I saw was pristine. I haven't seen it in about 20 years. When my grandaddy died my grandmother gave all the guns to my uncle, him being the son, thankfully my uncle is allowing me to buy some of the guns rather than just giving them all to my cousins. I don't hold it against him that I am having to buy said guns, its just how he is, and this is bidness.
 

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I'm originally from the IT myself. My great, great grandfather was a cow-boy on one of the big cattle operations in the Cherokee Strip. He made the Run of 1893 and homesteaded land out west of Cherokee. It's still in Throckmorton hands. I was born in Cherokee and grew up in a farm town just south of Enid, right on the Chisolm Trail. I admire a person who loves their family history. Thanks for sharing your family pieces. Great history.

Rick Throckmorton
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I'll start with the 1883 which as far as I can tell is entirely correct except for no acid etched FSS on the barrel. I believe I have read that not all the early .44WCFs had that marking but not certain that is accurate in 1883. It has the caliber on the underside of the barrel as well as on the trigger guard, it has the barrel address on top, and it has the patent dates and matching serial numbers everywhere including partially readable written on inside of grips.

According to my grandfather's research, this gun came from Schuyler, Hartley, and Graham like I am certain hundreds if not 1000s of others. Our 1st family history of it was that my great great grandfather took it in trade from a cowboy for a horse and saddle on Congress Avenue in Austin, Tx in 1892, most likely in front of Haschke Dry Goods, a grocery he was known to do business with on Congress Avenue. From there until the early teens it was his personal firearm. According to family history it killed many a hog or steer to be butchered and on at least one occasion was used to blow a hole in his barn in the act of killing a diamondback. About 1914, he took to bed and basically never left the house after that. My Great Grandfather inherited the pistol from him and began using it as opposed to a 38wcf he had already acquired. My Great Grandfather was quite the horseman and spent many a day ahorse according to family stories. I think he is where the gunbelt comes from, as it just fits him better then his father based off what I know of them. I have only one colorful story of him and the gun, it involved him and his ranch hand heading out to check some fence they were thinking about replacing, when they road up on the fence in question, they caught two gentlemen in the process of cutting said fence, it is supposed to rustle cattle, my great grandfather gave them two choices, he could take them in to the sheriff, or they could volunteer to spend the day replacing the length of fence my Great Granddad had planned on replacing. By all accounts they were very industrious workers and built a very long lasting fence. When he passed away in 1957, the gun basically was retired from use as to my knowledge neither my grandad or my uncle ever carried the gun in anyway, it just set in the display cabinet, and was occasionally take out to be oiled. Pics are below.

One issue I have had with both of these guns is that neither of them am I able to remove the cylinder bushing. Should I let it go and not worry about it or is there a preferred method to loosen up the bushings?



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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm originally from the IT myself. My great, great grandfather was a cow-boy on one of the big cattle operations in the Cherokee Strip. He made the Run of 1893 and homesteaded land out west of Cherokee. It's still in Throckmorton hands. I was born in Cherokee and grew up in a farm town just south of Enid, right on the Chisolm Trail. I admire a person who loves their family history. Thanks for sharing your family pieces. Great history.

Rick Throckmorton
Thanks, is IT Indian Territory? That is all that is coming to mind for me, was just curious.
 

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Hi There,

I like your 1883. I have one myself (with the same markings). Mine was
made a little after yours (serial # 99,6XX) and also when to Hartley & Graham
(Shuyler had retired or died by 1883). My etched panel is not visible anymore.
I'm sure it was removed at some previous refinish it underwent in its 134 year
journey to me.

The only thing that jumps out at me is the base pin looks like a later replacement.

Great stories and a wonderful piece of Family History (because it is His-Story).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Edit: Here is a similar view of the patent dates
 

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To remove the stuck bushings - after soaking in oil, insert the base pin from the back side and gently tap the base pin with a leather or rubber hammer. I've used this method all my life to cure this common problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi There,

I like your 1883. I have one myself (with the same markings). Mine was
made a little after yours (serial # 99,6XX) and also when to Hartley & Graham
(Shuyler had retired or died by 1883). My etched panel is not visible anymore.
I'm sure it was removed at some previous refinish it underwent in its 134 year
journey to me.

The only thing that jumps out at me is the base pin looks like a later replacement.

Great stories and a wonderful piece of Family History (because it is His-Story).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb
Thanks I will have to check it. I may have switched it with the 1903 when i wad oiling them today. To my knowledge it doesn't have any replacement parts while the 03 one has had some work/refinishing.
 

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I will take some more pics in a bit when I get better lighting, but for now these will have to do.

The pic below is of my great grandfather's 1903 .38WCF, and my great great grandfather's 1883 .44WCF between them is my 2012 .45 Colt.

Also included is a belt and holster I know nothing about that came with the .44WCF. I have looked for makers mark or leather worker name on it but haven't found anything. It needs some work, there is some dry rot present and the brass brads have corossion on them. There is also some green corossion present in a few of the bullet sleeves on the belt. The buckle is in good shape as is all the stitching, the leather just needs some good conditioning.

The horns I use for my hat rack in my office came from the lead steer on the WW White Ranch outside of Brady, Tx. It was the lead steer on the last cattle drive they sent up the Chisholm Trail in the early 1890s I believe. It was given to my great grandparents who were neighbors to the Whites as a house warming gift.

The branding Iron is one used by my grandfather that has his brand on it. We have never actually hot branded cattle as long as I have been around.

I have some Buffalo Arms black powder loads I will try in the guns. They both seem to be in perfect working order, all 4 clicks, no cracks or issues that I can find with function.

The one issue I have discovered is trying to get the cylinder bushing out of either of the two 1st gen guns is proving difficult. I sprayed some rem oil around them to try to soak in and loosen them but nothing yet.

Both guns have all matching serial numbers, though according to family history the barrel on the 38WCF has been shortened as it was originally a 7.5" gun. I will post more info about them with the better pics later. Including why the .38 doesn't have its factory stocks anymore.
View attachment 442218 View attachment 442226 View attachment 442242 View attachment 442250
Cobb, great story.. there aren't enough of these stories being told in my opinion. And smart-move to pick a few of those Colts up from your relates! I wish more of my-own families heirlooms were left in existence like yours...I've got the old Irons like you, & just to note; hot-brand isn't as dreaded a-thing as you might think (our calves still all get it on the back-right every spring by hot-brand) ;) the guns though, family lost our originals through two house fires back in the 30's & late 40's, bad luck I guess.. the only one that made it was my grandfathers old service 303 and afterward the lost ones only got replaced by newer bolt-actions, laws were changing regarding sidearms and no revolvers were later bought.. damn shame-- (so with history like yours-have, hang on tight)

Anyhow, little different note away from the sixguns & hot-irons.. in that second pic there's a good-looking bronze with a rider moving some longhorns(?) That's a neat piece in-itself!!!


Great thread right here, love these ones
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Cobb, great story.. there aren't enough of these stories being told in my opinion. And smart-move to pick a few of those Colts up from your relates! I wish more of my-own families heirlooms were left in existence like yours...I've got the old Irons like you, & just to note; hot-brand isn't as dreaded a-thing as you might think (our calves still all get it on the back-right every spring by hot-brand) ;) the guns though, family lost our originals through two house fires back in the 30's & late 40's, bad luck I guess.. the only one that made it was my grandfathers old service 303 and afterward the lost ones only got replaced by newer bolt-actions, laws were changing regarding sidearms and no revolvers were later bought.. damn shame-- (so with history like yours-have, hang on tight)

Anyhow, little different note away from the sixguns & hot-irons.. in that second pic there's a good-looking bronze with a rider moving some longhorns(?) That's a neat piece in-itself!!!


Great thread right here, love these ones
Thanks, the hot branding isn't a dread thing, we just don't brand. We ear notched for a while. Now we just ear tag em.

The bronze is a repro Remington titled "Stampede " the Driskell Hotel in Austin has one similar I believe. I bought it at Sam's Club of all places about 15 years back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
This 1903 .38wcf to my knowledge was bought brand new. My great grandfather had gone on a trip to either Montana or South Dakota to go bear hunting with some friends. As I understand it he never found the bear, but came home with 2 new things. A brand new Colt .38 WCF and a hereford bull. The Colt stayed with the family...the Bull promptly succumbed to Tick Fever. As I have said previously my great grandfather was very fond of being ahorse and my mother has several photos of him mounted, a few have this gun on his belt. When my his father passed on, he started carrying the old .44 and this one was retired to the sock drawer until his eldest son came of age and started using it. In the late 20s at the tender age of 18 my grandfather went into the oil business as a roughneck. I know in 1931 he was a driller in Kilgore, and that was where the .38 lost its factory stocks. Family history is somewhat cloudy on whether he was in the wrong place at the wrong time and got caught up in a riot or if he was in bar or brothel and caused the riot, the details do agree though on the fact that while removing himself from the scene someone attempted to mug him and he pistol whipped him with the butt of the gun breaking the factory grips. He returned home in the late 30 to manage the local cotton gin for a friend and was later given a draft deferment to keep said gin running during WW2. He used the .38 as his horse/truck gun up into the end of the war. When his youngest brother returned from Europe he brought gifts. A Browning Superposed for his father( I would love to get that gun but.....), a pair of wooden shoes from Holland for his mother, and a bring back .45 Government model for him and each of his brothers. My grandad apparently didn't take long to warm to the new gun and the single action was retired to the display case with the .44 and the nicer condition colts. He would on occasion break it out to shoot, but the .45 was his personal gun for the rest of his days, except for a Colt Python he got somewhere when he was in his 70s and liked to take with him when he worked cattle. It doesn't have the originality of the .44 and I know has been refinished at least once and had the barrel shortened. It may have had some work done on it I don't know, but it is tight as can be for a 114 year old gun.



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