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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The hunt is just as fun as the find...but I have been on the hunt for a while (talking to many of you on here, calling online sellers, looking at gun shows/auctions/online) and I FINALLY found an original Colt M1900 nickel magazine "Pat'd Sept 9 1884". I recently purchased an early 3 digit SN (277) a little bit ago and have been looking for an original magazine to go along with it. I finally was able to track one down and purchase it. Just got it in the mail today :) Its a little rough...but I don't mind at all!
Big THANK YOU to Paul over at the Colt Archives for this one.
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I was also able to pick up another early automatic pistol to go along with my Colt M1900.
Here is the new addition along with the M1900.
.35 S&W Auto 1913 SN 839. From what I understand, these were S&W first automatic pistols they produced and were designed to compete with the Colt 1903. This one was first year of production (I believe) and fits in well along my first year production M1900. I dont know much about this gun at all but Im eager to find more info on it.
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Love that 1900. It presents beautifully. Those nicely mellowed stocks have just the right color and figure to set off that wonderful early blue (quite a bit of it remaining, too - not easy to find 1900s with much finish).

Although I've no experience with the early S&W autos, you can't not love the fit and finish of a Smith. That grip safety on the front strap always looked awkward to me, though I've never handled one.
 

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Beautiful Model 1900! Excellent additions, both the original magazine and the S&W. Where you aware that the early nickel 1900 mags came in two configurations? The earliest variation lacked the hump over the top of the mag catch groove.

The PAT'D Sept 9, 1884 referred to the Louis D Diss patent for removable magazines which expired in 1902.

Any idea why the early mags were nickel. Maybe so when they were ejected and hit the dirt, the mag was easier to find? Lanyard rings anyone like the early 1911's especially if shooting on horseback?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Love that 1900. It presents beautifully. Those nicely mellowed stocks have just the right color and figure to set off that wonderful early blue (quite a bit of it remaining, too - not easy to find 1900s with much finish).

Although I've no experience with the early S&W autos, you can't not love the fit and finish of a Smith. That grip safety on the front strap always looked awkward to me, though I've never handled one.
Thank you! That front safety is definitely a little awkward in how you are supposed to engage it while handling the firearm. It hits right in the crease of a knuckle for me and is not an easy safeyt to work haha. It kinda reminds me of the Colt 1908 .25 in that you need to either have small hands, or an awkward grip to press the grip safety and still be able to pull the trigger. The S&W has some cool design features to rack the slide, but it never really did too well as proof when they relaunched it in .32 and only made 900 units or so in the 20's. I believe these are undervalued right now and HOPEFULLY will just go up in value. Now to find some .35 auto ammo....hmmmm
 

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Very very nice Model 1900 !
 
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Those are both beautiful pistols. As mentioned above, the grip panels on the 1900 are very nicely aged and look awesome. I really like the S&W as well. Nice!
 

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Just so, it happened I had the Std. Cat. of S&W next to the chair this morning. On page 284, there are a couple of paragraphs about the Mdl of 1913 in .35 S&W Auto. According to the text, there were about 8350 produced between 1913 and 1921, in about 8 variations. My guess is your s/n is in the 2nd variation.
 
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