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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all!

I short time ago I purchased my 2nd revolver, 1st 357, and 1st Python from another forum member (Parrisjr). I absolutely love it. The finish is just about perfect, the action is smooth, and the bore is shiny. I think it has been fired very little.

Doing business with Parrisjr was an absolute pleasure. He was great to deal with and very helpful, and gave me the gun for a fair price that we both agreed on. He packaged the gun very securely and even threw in a new Colt zipper case. I couldn't be happier with the transaction.

My predicament now is should I shoot it or not? I'd love to hear opinions on this. On one hand, I want to keep the gun in great shape and don't want it to ever go out of time. On the other hand, I want to enjoy it to the fullest, and I know shooting it would be a blast. If I do shoot it, it won't be a ton, probably a couple hundred rounds a year at most.

And now the most important part of the post: pictures. I have also included my other 2 Colt handguns (Series 80 GCNM and XSE Combat Commander) that are in my small collection. Enjoy and let me know what you think!

Firearm Gun Trigger Gun barrel Revolver
Firearm Gun Revolver Trigger Gun barrel
Gun Firearm Revolver Trigger Airsoft gun
Gun Revolver Trigger Air gun Airsoft gun
 

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I don't think shooting a couple hundred rounds a year will hurt it's value. I would watch how you close the cylinder- try to line up the bolt with the lead/groove at each bolt notch so it just scrapes the groove and not the entire cylinder face. That will prevent a noticeable turn line. I wouldn't shoot the Hottest 357 mags and Id probably shoot more 38 specials for plinking. The real hot 357 mags might make some "tatoo" marks from the rachet on the inside back of the frame. I'd clean it /oil/wax it (whatever you like) after every shooting. Id be careful not to scrape it or bang it into things and in general Id treat it well.
If you do that, I doubt anyone could tell whether you shot 6 rounds or 6oo rounds or maybe even a couple thousand round thru it. Being that the crazy prices Pythons bring are primarily based upon COSMETIC condition, (ESpecially on gun broker internet auctions), you should not hurt the value much at all by shooting it with care.

Also how would you know if it performs like a Python should unless you at least test it? If it shoots less than inch groups at 15 yards,for example, you may want to put a premium on it. IF you can only get say 2" groups at that range you may let it go for less.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the advice! I have tried to "index" (I think is what it's called) the cylinder when I close it to prevent a turn line like you have said, and the timing is pretty much dead on so the bolt never touches the cylinder outside of the leads during normal operation.

If I shoot it I will probably load some light 357s to shoot in it. Maybe 38s, but I have a lot of 357 brass laying around. I certainly treat it gently to protect the gorgeous finish!

I won't ever sell this gun (short of a personal financial crisis, at least), so I'm not too concerned with value, more with keeping its good looks. Although it is nice to know that if I ever have to sell it, I will probably be able to get at least what I paid for it.
 
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