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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is regarding HOW to tighten the rear sight within the topstrap. This method is the CORRECT method in my mind. I tried explaining it to Colt Customer Service and they didn't want to hear about it. I have done several this way and it has worked very well. Kudos to those that have presented methods with shims or with enlarged roll pins, but I do not feel that shimming or using larger pins is the correct methodology. If the sight is loose, it needs to fit tighter on its own.

Yes, I have borrowed images from elsewhere. Thank you!

I will not go into rear sight removal and so on because that's previously been addressed. I will say that placing a small magnet on the sight is a good idea. The elevation screw has a detent ball underneath of it. This ball is NOT secured and "small" doesn't even begin to describe its lack of size. If you lose this ball, you have more than likely lost this ball forever, hence the magnet.

After you have removed the rear sight, you will notice that the underside of the sight looks like this:

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You will notice that the topstrap looks like this:

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From these viewpoints, it's easy to see how the sight fits onto the revolver. Please observe the sight in the upside-down position. The raised portions of the sight-tang (where the retaining pin passes through) will determine how snuggly this sight fits. You will need a pair of Vice Grips. On the underside of the sight, you want to clamp the vice grips to the sight where the retaining pin goes. You only want to cover up about half of the holes' size. Adjust the Vice Grips so when you squeeze the grip together, this area is only compressed a little bit once the Vice Grips are locked. Now check the sight in the topstrap. Did it slide in there easily with no resistance? If so, you have more compressing to do. Adjust the Vice Grips a little bit tighter. Try it all again. You want to take baby steps! Keep going until the compressed portion is resistive when trying to place it in the topstrap. Once the sight-tang is compressed enough that it is quite hard to get it in, tap it into the topstrap, tighten the screw, install the retaining pin. When tightening the adjustment screw make sure the detent ball is in its little "pocket", otherwise it will spin around in circles with the screw. When everything is together the sight is nice and tight! The sight-tang appears to be made from a spring-steel so the tension should be long-lasting. I did this to my sight about 9 or 10 months ago. It was the lab rat. I've had my sight up and down more times than I can count and it's still tight.

If you have your New Python here for action and trigger tuning, we can tighten the rear sight for $20. It takes a little over a half-hour and I ordered 1,000 ball bearings that are the same size as the microscopic, unsecured detent ball so if we lose it, we can rapidly replace it. While your sight is apart we apply a light dab of gun-grease to the adjustments for smoother operation and wear prevention. If you choose to do this yourself and lose your detent ball, the size needed is .1 mil and be prepared to order a pack of like 250 of them, but they don't cost much. Amazon sells them and they're warehoused in the U.S. unlike the balls on ebay that ship from China.

This method has been proven to work extremely well. My sight returns to absolute zero every single time I move it around. The feedback from my customers has been very positive. There are no shims to wear out or break. Personally, I feel they should be doing this at the factory. I may continue on my quest to work my way past Patrick, the "horses a**" customer service manager. If this was done on the assembly line at the time of sight installation, it would add less than 1 minute. Good luck!!
 

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I would like to see a picture of the vice grips in place on the sight where you are squeezing. By your description it seems to me that there would be a chance to mark the top of the sight with the teeth from the vice grips. It also seems to me that you could squash the retaining pin hole making reassembly a lot more difficult. Do you have before and after squeezing pictures?
Thank you;
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I will get a pic today because I do have a Python to tune. Important to know, that sight is made from extremely hard spring-steel.
 

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Very nice of you to share your findings and results. There have forum members asking about that very fix and trigger/action work. Please share your company name and contact info.
Vic
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Heffron Precision©. We are located in Osage, Iowa. In business since 1989. Our website is:

www.heffronprecision.com

I personally take care of all gun tuning. I will admit to being a "control freak" regarding this, but I have repaired and tuned Colt revolvers for over 30 years and I have my own way of doing things I guess. My wife handles the shipping and other paperwork. I have 2 part-time machinists (retired machinists) who deal with major machining issues and parts-manufacturing.

We are a small company and we always have been. Between repairs and custom work (mostly custom work) we have around 550 - 600 firearms go through here annually. You can call 641-732-0050 10AM - 4PM CST M-F. Just ask for Mike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I didn't get a pic up yesterday. I didn't have a Python on the roster, but rather a SAA and a Smith 686.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here are some additional photos which outline my tightening. It truly works very well. The key is to adjust the vice grips, squeeze just a little at a time until the sight fits snug/tight in the topstrap. When a snug fit is achieved, screw the sight down and press the "squeezed" portion of the sight into the topstrap. Then drive in the pin. Use a nylon hammer OR something hard and non-scratching between your hammer and the pin while driving it in flush. Then use a 1/16" punch to drive in the pin just below the surface.
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Slightly different topic but does anyone know the size of Allen wrench needed for the wind age adjustment?
 

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So, the 'play' is radial, for and aft, yaw or? 1. How about an elastomer shaped like the recess in the sight that extends so as to pre-load the sight against the tension pin? It would likely require a slave pin to install, but could be done. 2. One might also machine a bit of alloy to fit that same recess in the sight body which could be bored to contain a spring which would then pre-load the sight body against the tension pin. 3. Or, one could also fit a brass or other bushing into the sight's tension pin holes. 4. Finally, wait for Colt to upgrade the design.

Also, why not install the tiny bearing with a thick grease like Valvoline synthetic wheel bearing grease? It will stay in place until removed.
 
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Here are some additional photos which outline my tightening. It truly works very well. The key is to adjust the vice grips, squeeze just a little at a time until the sight fits snug/tight in the topstrap. When a snug fit is achieved, screw the sight down and press the "squeezed" portion of the sight into the topstrap. Then drive in the pin. Use a nylon hammer OR something hard and non-scratching between your hammer and the pin while driving it in flush. Then use a 1/16" punch to drive in the pin just below the surface. View attachment 734303 View attachment 734304 View attachment 734305
I want to thank you again for sharing your knowledge and time.
 

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Nice expedient correction technique.

Additions to the process.........

First I'd recommend using a good set of Vise-Grips with either the serrations on the jaws ground smooth, or even better some brass shim stock mounted over the jaws to prevent scratching the finish on the sight.

Second, when working on small assemblies like this, put it in a larger clear plastic bag and work with your hands inside. That way anything that gets loose is caught inside the bag.

Second, using a stiff grease as a "glue" on Colt sights has long been a technique used to prevent loosing those %&(#)@ tiny balls.

Using the "beer can" shim method that was posted on the site might be a better method to prevent any chance of damaging the sight.
I see visions of giving that last bit of squeeze with the Vise-Grips and seeing a sight lug breaking off or cracking.
 

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It's interesting to see how Colt's engineers complicated something very simple and functional, and by doing this they created something that doesn't work as well as the previous version, and also requires a more complicated milling process. Can anybody explain what the advantage of the new sight mount is supposed to be? :unsure:
 

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The pin is made of spring steel, so that sounds like a solution waiting for a problem.
Just like changing the the trigger guard and grip frame on their small frame revolvers. They took the best looking small frame revolver silhouette of all time and threw it away. The "gloved hand" explanation was/is completely ridiculous. This made the guns an eyesore and failed to take advantage of the already existing D frame holsters, grips, etc... already offered by aftermarket manufacturers. This could be remedied with a new DS or Diamondback line. The names still have value and they offer a great combination of looks and portability. Perfect for the current market.

I also had to roll my eyes at the "30% thicker" area under the rear sight itself marketing. If one wanted to add strength to a revolver frame, I would think that adding metal above the forcing cone would be the way to go about that. The I frame size had a hearty top strap. Adding unnecessary weight to an already hefty gun is never a good thing.

I am delighted that Colt is back in the double action revolver business, but this is not something that people buying a revolver with a $1,499 msrp should be dealing with. The new Python action has a lot going for it, and I hope the trend of new offerings continues. However, the engineers should stop throwing the baby out with the bathwater.
 
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