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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A Parker Trojan from the early 1930s I think. It was owned by the owner of a hardware store on Maryland’s Eastern Shore whose store stocked Parkers. The case is an old leather motor case for which somebody built a stand. It was at the Baltimore Antique Show several years ago. 30202B24-B9AA-4D7B-AB32-EDD544C17B0A.jpeg 185C69F0-B459-4F12-ABE7-1D1A49A9AE72.jpeg
 

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A similar Parker was my first, best and finally worst gun deal in my life. I was twelve years old in 1953. A old neighbor died and the county had a auction of his stuff. I had a little over 21 dollars on me from picking strawberries and working for farmers. I bought a beautiful double barrel hammerless Parker 12 gauge in excellent shape. It did have some engraving plus a extra ivory bead half way up the barrels. The barrels were fluid steel, NOT Damascus. I bid 21 dollars and won.
Evidently some gun nut couldn't make the auction but heard I bought it and tracked me down. My dad worked swing shift and wasn't home. A strange car pulled in our driveway about 5 pm. The guy said he just drove house to house and liked to buy or trade guns. I had to show him my new prize. Right away he started working a deal on me. My grandpa was living with us and yelled out to me, Kid, I wouldn't do anything until your pa gets home! That cinched it for me! I had to prove how smart and big I was and traded it for a Winchester model 67 and another off brand German double hammer shotgun. Dont even recall what I did with that one but probably later traded it off.
I was upstairs still awake that night about 12:30 A.M. when dad came home. I heard ma ratting me. I heard dad say, HE DID WHAT?!! Then he come upstairs and had a short talk with me. That was my first, best and worst gun deal I ever made. (Outside of later loosing some to theft) I would like to think it gave me a leg up on my next couple hundred gun deals I have done since.
 

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I've only ever owned two 12g shotguns in my life - a cheap Spanish side by side in the 1960's which I used for poaching, and an even cheaper Belgian hammer gun on which I had the barrels cut to 20" for CAS shooting. But I do appreciate the workmanship on old shotguns.
At the 1997 CCA show I was taking photographs of a fantastic display of Second Generation percussion Colts when the owner came over and berated me for not asking permission. I apologised and walked away with my tail between my legs. Later in the day as I was passing the guy came over and apologised to me for being a bit sharp - seemingly someone had upset him earlier and I took the brunt - and said I could take all of the photos I wanted. That guy was the late Jerry Bowe.
I met Jerry again the following year and discovered that one of his other passions was Lefever shotguns. He had an old Lefever advertising poster showing a hunter and his dog sat on a heather covered hill side but there was no artist's signature. He thought it looked Scottish or Welsh and asked if I'd seen anything similar. I said no but he gave me a copy of the print and said I'd see if I could come up with anything. A letter to the Welsh art museum drew a blank and a visit to the Museum of Art in Edinburgh had the same result. I wrote and let Jerry know and he said thanks for trying.
Imagine my surprise when some months later I receive an autographed copy of a beautiful book called "Uncle Dan Lefever" with Jerry's compliments. One or two of Jerry's guns were featured in the book. I emailed him to say thanks and he said I should study the book as he'd ask questions next time we met! A super gesture from a great guy.
I still don't own a shotgun but I think I appreciate the beauty of these old guns just a little more.

Rio
 

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I never thought myself a shotgun man but thinking about it I have shot far more game with a shotgun than anything else. I suspect most people have too. Once I was in Mexico and met a old reformed rouge that claimed to be Mexican and Apache. His most prized possession was a old beat up single barrel shotgun that many of us wouldn't have bothered picking up if we seen it laying in a weed patch. It kind of brought me down to earth.
 

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that is a beauty and a keeper for sure....well done
 
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Love Parkers! Have a VH 12, VHE 20, PH 20 but my favorite quail and dove gun is a LeFever 20 that I've owned for over 50 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Hi, Wolfcoin. I don’t know the wood. Its golden and fine grained. What you may be referring to is leather covering. The wood i can see is the frame inside and the partitions. From left to right of the lock is REGISTERED 4TH JANY 1861 i have no idea. the compartment that holds the shotgun lifts out with handles on both sides. Looks like underneath is intended for storage. There is a label inside but its long since lost legibility. I shot this old gun on a pheasant hunt. Its heavier than a browning o/u 20Ga feather weight.
 

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Beautiful. What color are the barrels? I ask because I have a "Western Arms by Ithaca" .410 SXS that has brown barrels. They don't look rusty or pitted at all, but I'm curious if they should be brown or blued and if I need to address anything.
Sorry for the hijack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hard to describe the color of the barrels. Brown tint, old blue? There is very little finish on the receiver.
 

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I have enjoy shotguns all my life. I grew up pheasant hunting on my grandparents farm in Michigan then followed that passion over the years with many trips out to Iowa, North and South Dakota and Montana. As I grew older, walking those pheasant fields got harder and harder so my field shotguns got traded for Trap guns.
My goto gun is high end O/U but I really enjoy shooting two old time classics I've picked up along the way.
Top one is a Winchester Model 12, made in 1914, but reborn sometime in the 60's with a make over by Simmons. The other one is a 1948 Remington Model 31TC, (I was 4 when this one was made)
I think there is nothing more pleasing than a fine old shotgun, both to view and shoot.
 

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A few years ago I came across a really nice Parker VH 16ga. I sent for a historic letter from the Parker Gun Collectors Assoc. and found out the gun was shipped to E.K. Tryon & Co. in Philadelphia PA, on January 26, 1909 with a selling price of $50.
The outside of the gun was in really nice shape, wood was good, nice patina on the metal, but if you looked down the barrels it looked like the craters on the moon.
Shot that gun for years, sweet little gun for both the grouse woods and the pheasant fields, but those pitted barrels really bother me.
In town we have a well known gun dealer with lots of history. One day I stopped by his shop with my Parker and asked if there was anything he would recommend on trying to clean up the bores. His advice was just to live with it as it really didn't make a difference as to how it shot.
He went on to tell me that those bores may have been purposely pitted by one of the owners, as back in those days it was thought that a rough bore would retard the wad slightly and give you a better pattern. He went on to say it was common to even pee down the bore to excellerate the pitting.
A few years ago I found a hunting buddy who really wanted this Parker, so down the road it went.
 

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One of the biggest mistakes I have made: I once owned a old Winchester model 12, 12 gauge with two sets of barrels, both numbered with the gun. A regular long barrel and a short riot barrel with the extended tube. It was well worn but still functioned great. In a week moment I sold it to a gunsmith friend. He re-blued it and was proud of it. I don't know what year it was made. I bought it about 1970 and I suppose it was around 40 years old then.
 
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