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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Got a box of socks yesterday (those in the know will get that joke)....and a few revolvers...1st mod Schofield (been looking for a decent one for a while); SAA's 28936 & 28983 (letter as shown, thought same shipment guns would be neat); 81xxx, .45 and the mysterious model 1888 Remington (with H&G assembly numbers)







Interestingly, I have 24xxx shipped in Oct '76, 30xxx shipped Nov '76 and 37xxx shipped Aug '77. Those 2 I showed must have sat for a while till ordered by Kittredge...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Very nice lineup there.

I was sittin next to OC when that Schofield came to his table down in Waco, same guy sold him the target NM #3 he has listed with the checkered trigger
I've already been tempted by that NM3 target. Maybe next time....he's looking for me something special in Tulsa this weekend.
 

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I've already been tempted by that NM3 target. Maybe next time....he's looking for me something special in Tulsa this weekend.

I like it too but the later target models don't get me too excited.

Did you see that 4 inch NM #3 in 44R with wood grips he had a while back? I'm still kicking myself for not getting that one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I like it too but the later target models don't get me too excited.

Did you see that 4 inch NM #3 in 44R with wood grips he had a while back? I'm still kicking myself for not getting that one.
If I did, I forgot about it, but a factory 4 inch would be rare.
 

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Wasn't the existence of an 1888 Remington discovered in recent years? Besides wood grips, what differentiates an '88 from a Model 1890 or a modified Model 1875?
 

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Wasn't the existence of an 1888 Remington discovered in recent years? Besides wood grips, what differentiates an '88 from a Model 1890 or a modified Model 1875?
Chaffee,

First off, since you have five (5) revolvers, that means you have two (2) pair of socks; that means you have one (1)l eft over that you can send me so I can have a "pair" when I got the S&W Mod. 3 revolver, LOL!!!! Those revolvers are just WONDERFUL, just a plethora of the Old West. Glad you got those!!!!

Now, to answer "Wyatt Burp"s question about the Model 1888...here is a picture from a magazine from long ago and I think it will answer your question about the '88. I hope it is readable....

$(KGrHqV,!qsFEFUeW9+rBRN6SNq0TQ~~60_57.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Wasn't the existence of an 1888 Remington discovered in recent years? Besides wood grips, what differentiates an '88 from a Model 1890 or a modified Model 1875?
To make a log story short...Remington went bankrupt in 1886 and were taken over by Hartley and Graham. H&G took the parts for the 1875's that were left, shipped them to NY and completed at least 700 guns (some sources say 1000). H&G called them the 'New Model Pocket Army'. All have 5 3/4 bbls with the 1875's 'E.Remington & Sons, Illion NY USA address, no web, the ejector housing of the later mod 1890. Also, assembly numbers are always found on the bottom flat of the bbl and underneath the ejector housing & sometimes on the frame. None have the HR grips of the 1890. Caliber marking (.44) is on the TG or frame or grips. Some have laynard rings, some don't. To my knowledge, all 1890's do. In 'The Guns of Remington' are pictures of 1888's in the 5-600 range. Mine is # 546. I now have examples of all three (75, 88 and 90).
 

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Hi There,

To make a log story short...Remington went bankrupt in 1886 and were taken over by Hartley and Graham.
Just to add to this, The Winchester Repeating Arms Co. partnered with
Hartley & Graham in the acquisition of the E. Remington & Sons Co. of
Ilion, NY.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb
 

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Chaffee, my offer to come and clean your guns still stands but I draw the line at washing socks! Some great additions to your "museum" there. Well done.

Rio
 

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To make a log story short...Remington went bankrupt in 1886 and were taken over by Hartley and Graham. H&G took the parts for the 1875's that were left, shipped them to NY and completed at least 700 guns (some sources say 1000). H&G called them the 'New Model Pocket Army'. All have 5 3/4 bbls with the 1875's 'E.Remington & Sons, Illion NY USA address, no web, the ejector housing of the later mod 1890. Also, assembly numbers are always found on the bottom flat of the bbl and underneath the ejector housing & sometimes on the frame. None have the HR grips of the 1890. Caliber marking (.44) is on the TG or frame or grips. Some have laynard rings, some don't. To my knowledge, all 1890's do. In 'The Guns of Remington' are pictures of 1888's in the 5-600 range. Mine is # 546. I now have examples of all three (75, 88 and 90).

I would think most of the '88 Models would be caliber marked on the trigger bow as its my understanding thats how the later 1875 Models were marked.

I have an early blued 1875 with the pinched front sight and its 44W marked on the lower left grip

fBB7jKV.jpg


I have only seen a few marked like this and they all had a pinched front sight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
My 88 has the caliber on the left rear TG bow.

Edit to add: Although called an 'ejector housing' that's a misnomer as the ejector is exposed. A more proper name would be 'base pin housing'.
 
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