Colt Forum banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,968 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the following thread, Gain Twist is mentioned:

http://www.coltforum.com/forums/colt-percussion-revolvers/73691-1860-question.html

Can forum members post clear examples (photos) of this? What model(s) were produced with gain twist. Obviously, the 1860, but any others? 1849, 1851, 1861? How about Colt Walkers and Patersons?

Are there any reproduction Colt Percussion revolvers out there that utilize this? If not, and if fairly commonplace in the 'real deals' (of course, depending on your responses), is it a fairly reliable way to determine, at the very least, if a barrel is original or a reproduction?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,675 Posts
I saw and learned from the same thread. Here's a shot of my (real) 1860's barrel from the breech end. As you hopefully can see, the rifling is almost straight to start and then the twist kicks in about 1/3 of the way down the barrel. Sorry for the crud inside, I haven't done a lot to seriously clean it yet.

My 1849 Pocket and my 1862 Police are the same way. I don't have an 1851 Navy (yet) but would wager the originals are gain twisted as well.

I also checked my Remington New Model Army and it's a little harder to tell (looking from the muzzle), but the twist may also relax a bit near the breech.

Hand Finger Arm Wrist Thumb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,278 Posts
My question is technical: If the twist starts out slow and gains as the projectile flies does it keep speeding up twist the farther the bullet flies? My guess is "yes." How would this be measured?
The moment the bullet leaves the barrel there are no longer any forces acting on it to increase velocity (and rotational speed), and velocity immediately starts to decrease. With the bullet decreasing in velocity it will retain the same amount of rotation it had as when it left the barrel, but won't gain any rotational speed. Finally the momentum/velocity of the bullet will slow down to the point that it is no longer rotating fast enough to remain stabilized.





Moonclip



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,739 Posts
The moment the bullet leaves the barrel there are no longer any forces acting on it to increase velocity (and rotational speed), and velocity immediately starts to decrease. With the bullet decreasing in velocity it will retain the same amount of rotation it had as when it left the barrel, but won't gain any rotational speed. Finally the momentum/velocity of the bullet will slow down to the point that it is no longer rotating fast enough to remain stabilized.





Moonclip



Thanks much. The bullet is just coasting after it leaves the bore. Makes sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,675 Posts
I just checked both a 2nd and 3rd gen. Colt M1860 Army from my collection. Both have gain twist rifling.
Sounds like the answer then is No, at least not for pinning down a 1st gen gun. However a lack of GT rifling is a definite negative indicator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,390 Posts
My 3rd Generation "Trapper" barrels (both barrels) do not appear to have gain twist rifling. The barrels are both serial numbered with the same serial number; I "assume" it was late manufacture, maybe toward the end when they were using up parts. Given that is hard to tell with the shorter barrels, the rifling shows no visual evidence of a twist change.
rayb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,832 Posts
Interesting!

So...at least some of the reproductions appear to have Gain Twist.

Eliminating one of the key deficits which may otherwise allow a fast determination of a 'fake' or 'rendition'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Uberti has never used gain twist rifling. You may want to look again.
You are correct, but, although both 2nd and 3rd gen Colt percussion revolvers were made from rough Uberti castings, they were machine finished, including the bore and rifling of the barrels, in the U.S. by the sub-contractor ( Lou Imperato).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,757 Posts
You are correct, but, although both 2nd and 3rd gen Colt percussion revolvers were made from rough Uberti castings, they were machine finished, including the bore and rifling of the barrels, in the U.S. by the sub-contractor ( Lou Imperato).

It's more complicated than that, but 2nd & 3rd Gen. are not gain twist. Mine aren't. Look again and measure.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top