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Many years ago I had a gun collector friend that was from back east and I heard was vaguely "connected". I always have been the unassuming type and always took everything I hear in a "Maybe yes, maybe no" fashion.
He traded me a beautiful Colt New Service in .38 special that had factory options, wide target hammer and trigger, checkered back strap. It didn't have adjustable sights but the action was highly tuned as was a few other guns I had swapped with him. The trigger was a hair trigger and I traded or sold the gun---But. When I traded the gun he told me, unnh, when or if ya sell that gun I would be a little careful.
I wondered about that and asked my best friend that knew him a lot better than I did what he might have meant.
He told me so & so, had a trucking company with a partner. He had
come off a long haul one night and got checking the books and found where his partner had been cheating him big time. The next day his
partner committed suicide with my friends new service.
Another story about him. One day he showed up at my house with two
young friends (Or relatives). Turned out one was a actor you all have seen on a old TV series if you are middle age or older.
The young guy (he was really nice, funny and likable) had never been around guns. He almost shot me! I have a autographed picture of him hanging in my garage.
 

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Not pretty, cheap and worn, but this old H & R was actually carried by a Chicago gangster during prohibition.
706847


KNO3

PS. I know you're all wondering, so it was my Grandfather's. Suffice it to say that several members of my family and extended family engaged in the full Chicago experience. But, of course, those days are long gone. (LOL)
 

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Super 38. Shipped to Kansas City in 1930, R.S. Elliott Arms Company. Lots of Mob activity in KC in that time period, although verbal history alludes to lawman ownership. Thanks.

The Kansas City massacre was the shootout and murder of four law enforcement officers and a criminal fugitive at the Union Station railroad depot in Kansas City, Missouri, on the morning of June 17, 1933. It occurred as part of the attempt by a gang led by Vernon Miller to free Frank "Jelly" Nash, a federal prisoner. At the time, Nash was in the custody of several law enforcement officers who were returning him to the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas, from which he had escaped three years earlier.

706850
 

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2 inch Police Positive Special shipped July 28, 1927 to the Chicago dealer who sold the Thompsons used in the St. Valentine's Day Massacre and the New York hit of Frankie Yale as well as the revolver used to murder Chicago reporter Jake Lingle..
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Maybe gangsters had some guns that were brought back from the Great European War?
Shortly after the St. Valentine's Day Massacre, there was a fire in a rented garage behind 1723 N. Wood Street in Chicago. Inside was the Cadillac touring car disguised as a police car and used in the massacre. It was partially dismantled, and also found in the garage was a Luger.
 

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"I suppose this 1934 Government Model could have been used May 23, 1934 by the Texas Ranger on whose credentials it's pictured. "

Rick,
To bad it was a Ranger nobody ever heard of.
randy
btw-nice pistol
 
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