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A interesting article on General Patton and his guns from the good old days of "Guns & Ammo" magazine-1971.

"In those days, Patton was quoted as saying that the auto was an arm of two parts, while the revolver required nothing other than loose ammunition. Also, the pistol was totally dependent on the condition of the magazine for proper functioning. He once told his nephew that the automatic pistol was a fine noisemaker for scaring people but that it was well to practice with the revolver if it was going to be necessary to fight with handguns to live. Patton also often stated that the handgun should never be drawn and pointed unless it was intended to shoot to kill. The nephew, Frederick Ayer, Jr., went on to become a fine pistol shot, eventually serving as a high-ranking FBI agent during WWII. As a boy, Ayer witnessed a very early version of Hogan's Alley (FBI Academy) animated target training, as practiced by his Uncle George Patton and a well-to-do Massachusetts sportsman. Col. Francis Throope Colby had set up a white-painted metal screen in his basement in the early 30s and projected upon it his own pictures of charging African game and spear-waving natives. Colby and Patton loaded .22 pistols with the now-unobtainable explosive-tipped rim fires and competed with each other in naming and hitting marks on the pictures. It is said they also competed in profanity, something else Patton used as part of his "warrior" window dressing. These practice sessions were part of Patton's life in the period between World Wars I and II. "

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Patton - a great man, saved Europe from the National Socialist Nazi Bastards- to damn bad he left us far to soon.

700801
 

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The supposed real story of why Patton didn't like auto pistols was he had filed the sear on a 1911 and ended up with an unintended discharge into the ground by his foot. He usually carried revolvers after that even though he did carry an issue Model M (don't know whether it was a .32 or .380). He also had a Woodsman...it looks like it had elephant ears stocks.
 

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I had a uncle that died about two years ago who told me he drove Patton a few times. Uncle Art was a MP dog man. Art and dad`s first language was German and that might have been something to do with it. I own this Uberti Patton commemorative. Bought it used/new for a good price many years ago. Still haven't fired it.
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And, no Art wasnt Pattons driver when he got killed.
 

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That linked G&A article is pretty interesting and comprehensive, and as far as I can tell gets all the guns right.

I think the title is a bit of an over-sell, though: "... Guns That Made Him Great"? No, not really.

From the 1912 Olympics, only Patton's fencing had any long-term impact as it is tied to his development of the saber named after him.

Patton engaged in a bit of gun-fighting during Pershing's Mexico expedition and 1918 in France. After that, it was tanks. It was his thinking, expertise, and leadership skills that made him great.

The troops loved Patton and Ike kept him around despite the problems he caused because he was a first-rate battlefield commander. I wouldn't look to Patton for any wisdom about handguns. His assorted guns, which didn't draw much notice until they showed up on newsreel from North Africa and then Sicily and continental Europe, were part of the persona he wanted to show. A vanity project. Maybe to compete with Monty's silly Renaissance-size beret ;)

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I actually had the pleasure to meet General Patton when I was 10 years old. His wife attended the same church as my family in Beverly Farms MA. On his last trip to the US he attended our church. My Father a World War I veteran spoke to him and i asked him to sign my church program which he did, unfortunately I do not know what happened to it.

Jim
 

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My ex wife’s Grandpa told me a story once. He said back in the war He was in the Navy USS Electra if memory serves me. It was a supply ship and he was on the beach running the supplies coming on the beach. And he sees this guy coming on the beach with a crowd of others all around him. So he asked a guy next to him who the big shot was. That’s Patton was his answer. He didn’t even know who he was at the time.
 

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A interesting article on General Patton and his guns from the good old days of "Guns & Ammo" magazine-1971.

"In those days, Patton was quoted as saying that the auto was an arm of two parts, while the revolver required nothing other than loose ammunition. Also, the pistol was totally dependent on the condition of the magazine for proper functioning. He once told his nephew that the automatic pistol was a fine noisemaker for scaring people but that it was well to practice with the revolver if it was going to be necessary to fight with handguns to live. Patton also often stated that the handgun should never be drawn and pointed unless it was intended to shoot to kill. The nephew, Frederick Ayer, Jr., went on to become a fine pistol shot, eventually serving as a high-ranking FBI agent during WWII. As a boy, Ayer witnessed a very early version of Hogan's Alley (FBI Academy) animated target training, as practiced by his Uncle George Patton and a well-to-do Massachusetts sportsman. Col. Francis Throope Colby had set up a white-painted metal screen in his basement in the early 30s and projected upon it his own pictures of charging African game and spear-waving natives. Colby and Patton loaded .22 pistols with the now-unobtainable explosive-tipped rim fires and competed with each other in naming and hitting marks on the pictures. It is said they also competed in profanity, something else Patton used as part of his "warrior" window dressing. These practice sessions were part of Patton's life in the period between World Wars I and II. "

View attachment 700799

Patton - a great man, saved Europe from the National Socialist Nazi Bastards- to damn bad he left us far to soon.

View attachment 700801
I still find what Patton wrote his family from Ft. Bliss is fascinating. He said that a Texas Ranger recommended that during a cavalry fight "Shoot the horse first, then the man"! Sounds as if that Ranger had some experience fighting Mexican bandits on horseback.
 

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from a post earlier today..

Yes, that is an amazing story of a Real West style gunfight! Patton had huevos, and seemed to enjoy being challenged to fight. No hampering rules of engagement, just win.
 

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I liked the part where he waited for the bandito to be unhorsed and stand up before engaging again. If it is true.

"In an act of chivalry, the American waits for the Mexican to extricate himself, stand up and pull his weapon—only then does Patton (and a couple of his men) shoot and kill him."

There have been a lot of good things lost in the last 100 years. I wonder if by the time Patton made Captain he'd offer the same chance again.

I am a little confused as to why his Colt had two notches cut in the ivory. If the story that is posted is true he killed one man with his Colt. Wounded a 2nd with the Colt that was later killed in the same dust up (but not by Patton) and helped kill (with the assistance of his soldiers also shooting rifles) a third with a rifle.

The guy didn't like the 1911 or pearl. And now the two notches?! :unsure:

But no doubt Patton had the huevos and skills of a true warrior.

Great thread and read Ugly, thank you for posting it.
 

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Discussion Starter #17

700852


"Patton led a foraging expedition of about a dozen men in three Dodge Touring Cars. Their job was just to buy food for the American soldiers, but one of the interpreters, himself a former bandit, recognized a man at one of the stops. Patton knew that a senior member of Villa's gang was supposed to be hiding nearby, and so he began a search of nearby farms. "

700853


Patton is #8 in the photo with Villa.
 

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Just a side story about Poncho Villa. When I was a kid about 1950, my folks had a old married couple as friends. Think he was kind of a shirt tail relative to my dad. The man had been in the infantry chasing Villa in Mexico. While they never did have contact with Villa he said a Indian scout came in with a rifle he stole off Villa sleeping in a cave! He claimed Villa was sleeping with some of his men, that he stole his rifle to prove he had been there! Who knows? I just thought the story was interesting to pass it on. The man was interesting. I dont know if it was before or after his army experience but he also told about he and some buddy's on a sort of hunting/exploring jaunt poking around in the mountains for about a year without seeing a road! Told of pulling their gear with toboggans etc. He also showed me a few old long guns etc. I was only about nine but wish I had the opportunity today to really grill him about details and record his story's.
 

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The Whit Collins article from the 1971 Guns & Ammo says that Patton used a .38 Long Colt service revolver in the 1912 Olympics. Seems like an odd choice, was a service revolver required or did he really use a first series Officers Model in .38 Special ? I would think something with a hand honed action and adjustable sights would be more competitive.
Was the Colt New Army and Navy Revolver Model 1903 in .38 Long Colt still the Army service revolver as late as 1912 ?
 

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Even if it wasn't a front line issue, I'm sure there were a lot in the armories. Also when it comes to target shooting (especially in the civilian Olympics), you often could use older more tried and true gun types.
 
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