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It sounds like you're already on as good a track as any advice you may get from us.
The powders you already have are excellent fast burning pistol powders, and will be the most economical with more loads per pound. Using case filling powders will usually translate to a slower burning powder which may not give you the performance results you desire. An evening spent in your easy chair with a good loading manual will give you some ideas about velocity/charge weight/powder types, and possibly shed some light on your powder choices.
You cannot choose a better brand press than the Dillon. I have two of the 550's and they are the greatest thing since sliced bread. If you don't have a Dillon catalog, find one and choose the press that best fits your needs. I like the 550 because it's easy to change calibers, fast, extremely reliable, and will easily handle any pistol or rifle caliber. Dillon service, if it's ever needed, is second to none, and they don't have any grouchy employees. The 650 has the capability to add a case feeder and a few more bells and whistles, but may be an overkill for the volume you mentioned. I've never used the Square Deal press, but I believe it requires a few more manual operations and doesn't have the flexibility of the 550.
 

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Even if you don't load up to the maximum levels, a chronograph can be a great help developing accuracy loads by revealing unwanted velocity spreads, determining the most efficient powder charge, compare velocity to group patterns, etc. I started with one of the inexpensive Chrony fold out models, that cost about 65 bucks at the time, and later advanced to a more sophisticated Pact chronograph. I still use the Chrony more often, because it's self contained and a more convenient. The disadvantage of the Chrony is that a misplaced shot can hit the electronics, where the Pact has the screens and electronics separate.
They vary from simple basic velocity readouts to mini computers that store and analyze shot strings. You can spend a chunk, depending on how far you want to go with the extra features. Some of the newer systems even have the capability of reading actual chamber pressure via stick on strain gages.

[This message has been edited by ohiobuckeye (edited 06-29-2005).]
 
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