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Whatever happened to the George Lawrence Holster Company? I remember years ago seeing their advertisements in nearly all of the outdoor magazines. I always wanted one of the basket weave holsters and matching belts. Quite a few years ago when I acquired a 6" Python and the finances to purchase the Lawrence belt and holster that I had lusted -poof they were gone. I never knew if they had been purchased by another leather manufacturer, or simply chose to liquidate and close their business. I sure do miss them.
 

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Geo Lawrence Co

3Thanks for the reply. The Vintage Leather website is quite interesting in developing the history of the George Lawrence Co from their origins until their demise. They have quite a collection of holsters from most all famous makers of the past. For a collector this is a “gold minel” website. Thanks
 

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Whatever happened to the George Lawrence Holster Company? I remember years ago seeing their advertisements in nearly all of the outdoor magazines. I always wanted one of the basket weave holsters and matching belts. Quite a few years ago when I acquired a 6" Python and the finances to purchase the Lawrence belt and holster that I had lusted -poof they were gone. I never knew if they had been purchased by another leather manufacturer, or simply chose to liquidate and close their business. I sure do miss them.
Lawrence holsters are easily acquired, in very good condition, on eBay. They turn up often in my own specialised search for vintage,antique holsters.

Lawrence came late to the holster business and in the early days was better known for fishing creels, which was Bill Lawrence III's passion. His father died in the '80s and Bill himself was paralysed in a riding accident -- shades of Christopher Reeves -- in the mid 1980s and the company sold to Gould & Goodrich by 1990. G&G immediately shut it down as a non-viable commercial operation. Jim Buffaloe 'came with' -- he formerly of Baker's Pancakes -- and took it on himself after G&G let it go. I do understand he passed away at the beginning of this century; and emails to Bill III 'bounce' so I suspect he has too (I see that from the link to the Lawrence papers that Bill III bequeathed them in 2009, so he has been deceased since at least that year).

Lawrence holsters of their era -- 1940-1970 -- were largely copies of Myres and Heiser and even Ojala. It was the appearance of John Bianchi and his Bianchi Holster, who spawned Neale Perkins and his Safariland with their prior partnership as Safari Ltd., who spelt the end for makers like Lawrence and Shoemaker as genuine players by switching the industry to the stocking dealer model in the mid-1960s. Only Jackass which became Galco (doesn't really stand for Great American Leather Company, it stands for Gallagher Company) really successfully took on that model in the '70s, and G&G continues to this day focusing on LEO (which Safariland virtually 'owns' with its kydex technologies).

So: go vintage, young man :). And find all the Lawrence holsters you want as long as you don't want to use them for anything silly like a Glock.
 

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3Thanks for the reply. The Vintage Leather website is quite interesting in developing the history of the George Lawrence Co from their origins until their demise. They have quite a collection of holsters from most all famous makers of the past. For a collector this is a “gold minel” website. Thanks
I, too, like this site a lot. It is not all correct, though, so tread wisely. The Lawrence section is very much on the money, as is the Brill section. Others, like Wroe, are just completely wrong, and big errors in Egland's bio; which happens enough that one should take every fact it profers as 'maybe, will double check'. The section on Heiser marks is 'kinda true' but not completely true: all the marks coexisted in 1930 and the earliest marks are used quite late (which we can measure when a holster model is introduced) so one CANNOT date a Heiser holster with Vintage Gunleather's formula (we know exactly when each catalogue was published, even when they are not date themselves; which tells us when a holster model was introduced; so the famous FBI holster called the 457 was introduced in its No. 32 catalogue which is accurately dated as 1939 -- and these have been found with all the marks including those said to have ceased use well before 1939). In fact no reason has ever been proposed as to why so many different marks exist at all for Heiser, as they all pre-date the ownership changes that began 1945 and virtually none contain the HHH trademark -- issued in the late 19th century!
 
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