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Discussion Starter #1
Would the Lee Turret Press Kit be a good place to start for a beginner looking to load 9 and .45 calibers? Or is there something better around that price point ($200-250)?
 

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I would look for a green one, meaning RCBS or Saeco/Redding If you are young enough to get good use of one. Lee makes a cast iron model that is probably ok. I admit to being a bit of a tool geek and like what I like, I really like my RCBS turret press and they can be had for under $200.00 if you shop around.
 

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I'll echo longranger's opinion on buying RCBS. You should be fine with buying used tools. RCBS has an incredible no questions asked replacement warranty as long as they have the parts in stock. Lots to choose from on eBay. If you decide on the Lee, it should work out fine.
 

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I also use a turret press. Most of my reloading gear is Lee. I think it's well made and affordable. Although nothing wrong with RCBS, Lyman or Dillon. The money I save on Lee, I put towards components.
 

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I started with watching my Grandpa on RCBS . I'm 63 and use the same brand . I don't recall the last time I bought store bought . They all work though or they wouldn't be in business .
 

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I admit to being partial to RCBS myself but I also have Lee, Lyman, Redding and Dillon stuff as well.
A good friend has been loading on a Lee Turret press for the 30 years I have known him and he likes it a lot. It is definitely faster than my RCBS single-stage.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank y’all. I looked at the RCBS kits and they are a good bit higher than the Lee’s, at least in the kit. May do some more looking to see if I can piece together some used stuff. The Lee’s just seemed convenient because I really have no clue what all I need. What about if I expand to rifle rounds such as 5.56 or .270? Will the Lee’s kit allow that? Or will I be buying a whole new set up down the road?
 

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I understand cost is a factor but try to get new stuff if you can. The kits were not an option when I started reloading so I had to piece everything together. Going along just fine...dang, I need one of these...lather-rinse-repeat. The kits are the way to go. They may seem expensive but they are cheaper in the long-run.
That Lee turret press will have no problems at all with 5.56 (.223) and should be OK with .270.
 

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RBK,
Once you get into reloading it will become an exercise of enjoyment. First, I would recommend that you pick up a couple of reloading manuals read and study. These could be used manuals a year or so old. Also study online info. For example, research the Lee site to find the answer to your question about 223 and 270. Too, there are many good instructional videos.
Then it would be a better time to determine your equipment needs. You may want to consider used equipment. Maybe build your own "kit". If you buy a kit, you still need a founded understanding of what each tool does.
My reloading days started in 1974 (like many others on this forum).
Vic
713173
 

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I guess the Lee press would be ok. I don't like the Lee dies because of the rubber bushing they use- or at least use to. Not extremely important on pistol but you can't get down to the .000" required for rifle consistency and accuracy. My single stage preference is the RCBS. They are bullet proof (yuk-yuk) and their customer service, if needed, are awesome. For pistol I prefer the Dillon progressive.
 

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I’ve been reloading since 1974 and still use my original RCBS single stage “Partner” press. When I started (knowing zilch about reloading) I spent time watching my old grouchy neighbor who showed me the ropes to getting started and how to reload safely.
Also I did as already suggested and got a new reloading manual and read it cover to cover.
 

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All of the above, unless you have the means and the need for a setup like Kerz’s. Especially like the Dewalt reloaders. (Tongue in cheek) That’s when you‘ve gotten serious. Been reloading almost 50 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
All great advice. I really appreciate it. Any good online sites to visit until I can get a book in hand?
 

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Watch FB marketplace and classified sections on various sites; you should be able to score some screaming deals on used equipment. If you have any gun shows near you coming up, there are ALWAYS deals to be had. My opinion is to avoid new (With the exception of Dillon), as most brands have lifetime warranties (Lee doesn’t, though I’ve heard they’re still decent to folks). Why new with Dillon? Equipment seems to sell used for around 85-90% of new. At that price just buy new. Good luck!
 

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The Lee classic turret is an awesome press to start with. It is inexpensive enough that if you decide reloading isn't for you it won't hurt so much.

I started on one and now have a Dillon but only because I really enjoy reloading 45.

Lee makes a lot of add-ons that work well. I loved the micrometer for the powder measure and the Lee factory crimp die.

the Lee manual also works really well with a Lee press.

Patrick sweeney also wrote a reloading for handgunners that is great for beginners.
 

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All great advice. I really appreciate it. Any good online sites to visit until I can get a book in hand?
RBK
A couple of links that will provide some good overall and detailed info.
Hickok45
RCBS

Vic
 
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