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Would the Lee Turret Press Kit be a good place to start for a beginner looking to load 9 and .45 calibers? Or is there something better around that price point ($200-250)?
I have been reloading for about 55 years. I started then with a Herter's press and I used it for many years. I bought an RCBS single stage Rockchucker press when I was in the Army and still use it today. I do also have a progressive system (Also RCBS) for pistol ammo. I suggest a single stage press to start out with and expand your tools as your needs dictate. Buy a good quality scale. My Ohaus (now RCBS) scale is still in perfect condition. I still prefer RCBS dies to all others. Tip: Always lubricate your cases because if you don't, you will get one stuck. If you have an RCBS die you can send RCBS the die with the stuck case and they will fix it. I only use carbide dies on straight walled cases. No lubrication needed with those. I use a hand priming tool with the single stage press as I can feel the primer seat better than in the press. Lee makes a good one of those. I suggest a Lyman reloading manual as the first thing you should buy. They have detailed, step by step instructions on reloading, along with load data for most calibers. A $15 subscription to AMMOGUIDE will give a lot of information about most calibers you will ever load, and it contains the most extensive loading data set that I have ever seen. Good luck!
 

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I have been reloading for about 55 years. I started then with a Herter's press and I used it for many years. I bought an RCBS single stage Rockchucker press when I was in the Army and still use it today. I do also have a progressive system (Also RCBS) for pistol ammo. I suggest a single stage press to start out with and expand your tools as your needs dictate. Buy a good quality scale. My Ohaus (now RCBS) scale is still in perfect condition. I still prefer RCBS dies to all others. Tip: Always lubricate your cases because if you don't, you will get one stuck. If you have an RCBS die you can send RCBS the die with the stuck case and they will fix it. I only use carbide dies on straight walled cases. No lubrication needed with those. I use a hand priming tool with the single stage press as I can feel the primer seat better than in the press. Lee makes a good one of those. I suggest a Lyman reloading manual as the first thing you should buy. They have detailed, step by step instructions on reloading, along with load data for most calibers. A $15 subscription to AMMOGUIDE will give a lot of information about most calibers you will ever load, and it contains the most extensive loading data set that I have ever seen. Good luck!
I agree 100% with what Vol423 says, especially about starting with a single stage press. Reloading can be interesting and very rewarding but it can also be hazardous if not given total focus on what you are doing and what is happening. A single stage press allows you to see, feel and hear what is happening at at each step in the reloading process. I have a Dillon Square Deal with 3 toolheads and a Dillon 550 with 5 toolheads but still use the RCBS single stage for working up new loads and small lots of ammo.

The Lyman reloading manual is excellent. They also have an excellent one that is focused on cast bullets and another on blackpowder loads. Speer, Sierra, Hornaday, Hodgon and Nosler (among others) also publish very gool manuals.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
I have been reloading for about 55 years. I started then with a Herter's press and I used it for many years. I bought an RCBS single stage Rockchucker press when I was in the Army and still use it today. I do also have a progressive system (Also RCBS) for pistol ammo. I suggest a single stage press to start out with and expand your tools as your needs dictate. Buy a good quality scale. My Ohaus (now RCBS) scale is still in perfect condition. I still prefer RCBS dies to all others. Tip: Always lubricate your cases because if you don't, you will get one stuck. If you have an RCBS die you can send RCBS the die with the stuck case and they will fix it. I only use carbide dies on straight walled cases. No lubrication needed with those. I use a hand priming tool with the single stage press as I can feel the primer seat better than in the press. Lee makes a good one of those. I suggest a Lyman reloading manual as the first thing you should buy. They have detailed, step by step instructions on reloading, along with load data for most calibers. A $15 subscription to AMMOGUIDE will give a lot of information about most calibers you will ever load, and it contains the most extensive loading data set that I have ever seen. Good luck!
Thank you. With your reply and a few others I am starting to put me a list together. I hope to for go the kit and just buy what I need.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
If I buy the Lee carbide dies for 45 acorns should I buy the 3 die set or 4 die set?
 

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Like Robert said...if the 4th die is the Lee Factory Crimp Die...get the 4 die set. I was hesitant to buy one for a while and finally decided to try it. It solved a few problems with chambering some calibers, especially bottleneck cases. I now have 4-5 of them.
 

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Those factory crimp dies are worth the extra few bucks they cost, I bought them individually for every cartridge I reload and use them on both my progressive and single stage presses.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Yes that’s what it was. Thanks. As far as powder scales, that looks like it’s another fairly expensive item. Is there a certain one I should look at it that is good quality for the price? I don’t want to go cheap on it, just don’t want to spend more than I have to but still wind up with a quality scale.
 

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I have been using the same RCBS (Ohaus) scale the late 70's. I have toyed with the idea of getting a newer one scale but this still works, is accurate (using check weights and bullets) and very consistent.
If you go the kit route, most kits include a scale. If you go separate pieces, stay with a known name brand as they are all pretty much built and function the same. RCBS, Lee, Lyman, Dillon, etc.
Electronic scales are more expensive and are sensitive to temperature changes and air currents (think ceiling fans and air conditioners). They also must be perfectly level.
 

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Here's another chance at a Lee Classic Turret Kit. I just remembered Titan Reloading and checked their site, they have the press kit in stock, $204.49.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Here's another chance at a Lee Classic Turret Kit. I just remembered Titan Reloading and checked their site, they have the press kit in stock, $204.49.
Thank you. Got it. I appreciate you letting me know that. Now I got to wait til Christmas to try it out.
I had really considered piecing one together and getting exactly what I want. But I think for $200 this kit will give me something to build off of and learn on.
 

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There may be a few things you'll want to upgrade over time, but the Lee kit looks pretty much complete and you should be rolling ammo the first day. I have stuff I like from all the reloading manufacturers, and some stuff I made or adapted myself. Having red, blue, orange, black, and various green tools is normal on any bench. Just my opinion, I think Hornady prints the best manual to teach reloading, and Lyman's is also pretty good. Keep an eye on dies you need and don't be shy about jumping on them when they come up for sale at regular prices. I would start gathering primers, powder, and bullets now, or as they become available. That way you'll be able to enjoy your press over Christmas week-end!..once you've studied procedure of course. Oh, a set of calipers will be of great use, they don't come with any kit I know of.
 

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Thank you. Got it. I appreciate you letting me know that. Now I got to wait til Christmas to try it out.
I had really considered piecing one together and getting exactly what I want. But I think for $200 this kit will give me something to build off of and learn on.
Good for you! Thats is a really good deal.
While you're waiting, get the reloading manual of your choice and start reading up on all the how's, what's and why's of reloading. If you have a friend who has been reloading for a while, ask if you can watch him load a few rounds. Like krag96 said...start gathering supplies.
There are always "new and improved" gadgets and gizmos you will see that you can add to your reloading set-up. Some are a great help, others not so much. Enjoy the ride!
 

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Very good advice^^^
Vic
 
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