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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well if you recognize the SP number, you know where this is starting. I know where it will end up, just nor sure how long it’s gonna take. For you folks who haven’t picked up on what just happened, hop on and enjoy the ride. I bought a Stainless Colt Gold Cup Commander (previously owned w/poor condition but s/n box) several years ago. It appeared unfired but that’s not important to the story. During a forum thread some time back I decided to dig it out as the chatter involved the grip variations. Mine are rubber and I decided to pull them off to verify back markings. I discovered black rubber transfer. I put the gun on the bench and dispatched the cruddy deposit without issue. I left the grips off because there appeared to be aged factory traveling oil/lubricant/rust protective substance within the gun. Ok, I know this is getting boring but the pin/s punch line is almost here. Those of us who own the old Gold Cups as in 70 guns know of the depressor and depressor spring (which is the size of the date on a dime) and the rule to avoid taking it out unless absolutely necessary. I have adhered to that rule. Ready? Well my Gold Cup Commander (80 Gun) that I just opened has those parts! Guess I figured they wouldn’t stick 80 guts AND these chase me parts in the same gun. Wrong. Good news is they never moved during tear down, the gooo held them to adjacent parts; more good news, I own 10 disconnectors and 6 SP52445 (springs). Gun and guts will be in ultrasonic detox for undetermined period of time while I review the secret handshake and Navy vocabulary needed to put these pesky parts back together. No, I’m not taking the easy exit, early out with a spacer. I figured I would face this demon some day, I just didn’t know it would be on this simple but unplanned hazmat mission. Stay tuned, I’m going in. I’ll be back between now and Valentine Day. One should cherish missions that challenge aged eyesight and less steady hands...but my Navy vocabulary is still good to go.
 

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If you are talking about the tiny sear depressor (often just called the depressor) and the even more tiny spring that is under it often called the sear depressor spring or just depressor spring then those were associated with a special sear that was used with the wide steel trigger that Colt used in the Gold Cup National Match pistols (and Gold Cup Commanders) from 1957 till 1996. In 1997 the Gold Cup Trophy was introduced with the wide Aluminum trigger. The Series 80 mechanical firing pin safety was introduced in 1983.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
If you are talking about the tiny sear depressor (often just called the depressor) and the even more tiny spring that is under it often called the sear depressor spring or just depressor spring then those were associated with a special sear that was used with the wide steel trigger that Colt used in the Gold Cup National Match pistols (and Gold Cup Commanders) from 1957 till 1996. In 1997 the Gold Cup Trophy was introduced with the wide Aluminum trigger. The Series 80 mechanical firing pin safety was introduced in 1983.
Thanks for the clarification, so the Jesus Spring can be detected with a magnet (steel trigger) (so to speak). Makes sense since the depressor/spring were related to the heavy trigger. I thought the depressor/spring went away earlier. The gooey stuff that was all over the gun interior came off very easy in the ultrasonic. I could have done the job without disassembly, but I didn’t think to try it that way first. It would be interesting to know who used what on the gun before I bought it.
 
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