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And bring the price of legal Ivory (pre-ban) down!
 

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I want a set of Ivory's for my new nickel 1903.
found one set Ohio legal $700. Yikes.
 
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Oregon has its own regulations on ivory so I bet the hunter haters will make laws state by state to make ivory illegal.
 

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I see the Clinton offspring is stating that this will only expand poaching, so I'm afraid I'll have to say it must be a bad thing.
Bad, bad thing.
A thing very much of badness.
It may even verge on badness of a downright evil sort.
Sigh.....
Denis
 

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I'm not getting my hopes up...These are the same people for the last 12 years who have been trying to save money by Firing all the CATTLE GUARDS.:bang_wall:

But I thank Rick for keeping us up to date.
 

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Seems good for the poachers, bad for the elephants.

Trophy hunters claim that Western tourism provides revenue to the local communities, that in turn helps to fund conservation. However, local corruption seems to prevent that from happening.

I'm not anti-hunting for sustenance or culling of nuisance animals. I am against trophy hunting, though.
 

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I will go on the record as opposing this regulatory change. I am not surprised at this recommendation from the Chief, USF&W Service and his chum Donald Jr who considers this sport. I salute the Chief's service as a SEAL but this is contrary to the biological situation and will bring unnecessary pressure on the species.
 

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Everyone is certainly entitled to their opinion but a lot of folks base their opinion on what amounts to "fake news" with respect to African Elephants. The biggest problem for Elephants in Africa is not poaching and certainly not trophy hunting. The biggest threat to Elephants, in the four countries that have Elephants, is land management. One adult requires 167 sq. miles of forage. The population of African elephants is large and expanding, with more than 700,000 within the region. The health of the Elephant population depends on it's value. If there is no legal hunting or ivory trade, the Elephant has no value to the African people. It instantly becomes a seven ton varmint that has no natural enemies, lives to be 50 years old and eats anywhere he wants. This presents a problem for indigenous people that are trying to feed themselves by changing from a hunter-gatherer society to an agrarian society. Elephants are NOT endangered but they could be if the resource isn't managed to the benefit of both the African people and the Elephants.
 

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Seems good for the poachers, bad for the elephants.

Trophy hunters claim that Western tourism provides revenue to the local communities, that in turn helps to fund conservation. However, local corruption seems to prevent that from happening.

I'm not anti-hunting for sustenance or culling of nuisance animals. I am against trophy hunting, though.
Compare the population trends for elephants in the countries that allow hunting to countries where the practice is banned. Anti-hunting countries have seen serious declines in elephant populations.

Eco-tourism simply won't pay the bills for conservation and these countries are too poor to do it themselves. Like it not, high dollar hunts by well healed hunters is the only sustainable way to ensure that money flows into those countries for conservation.

Plus, often times the hunters are taking nuisance animals.
 

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This sounds like deer in this country. There are so many that wherever hunting is not allowed the numbers are so large and their health poor. There's only so much foliage for them to share so they become undernourished and unhealthy. Around Camp David there is no hunting allowed and the deer population there is pretty sickly. A number of otherwise non-hunting areas have to hire professional hunters to thin the numbers.

While I'm not saying this is exactly like the issue with elephants, it is similar.
 
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I've never believed that a single elephant was saved by not letting a sport hunter take his trophy home. The large-scale trade in commercial ivory is a different story, but that's not what this is about. And the arguments in favor of the beneficial effects of sport hunting in the African countries are clear and don't need to be re-hashed.

That said, I'm not overly thrilled that the Trump administration decided to make Zimbabwe one of the two initial countries benefiting from the new policy. Zimbabwe is likely the most abysmally corrupt nation in Africa; I highly doubt any extra revenue will survive long enough to actually benefit wildlife and the people, and if the current political turmoil leads to more instability and more poaching (which it usually does in Africa), this could badly backfire.
 

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As a kid, Oklahoma in the 1930s we hunted & shot anything that flew, ran or slithered. Grown up a bit, hunted deer in California. 1946-1975 Africa, I lived a few months in four countries & spend a few days or weeks in 9 more, early-on carrying my .44 Russian S&W New Model #3 Target. With all kinds of opportunity the only animal I killed was a civet, with my .44 Russian, with the car lights its color & spots I thought I was shooting a leopard but it was a more canine animal of about 50 pounds weight. I seem to have lost most of my interest in killing for sport. In Africa I marveled at the huge elephants, rhinos & hippos & never thought of killing one.


When I was getting ivory grips carved in Belgian Congo. there with my new wife working in 1951, I visited the gov't ivory warehouse with the native carver to buy ivory. Surprised in the many tons of ivory they held & the huge size of some tusks, 6 or more feet long & bigger diameter than my leg at the hip - I tried to imagine the size of herd it might have been, like buffalo in American past. These tusks looked more like "finds" than kills, aged & weathered. Only sales were to local carvers in small amounts; an effort to give employment to native population. Probably in the 1960s when African gov'ts went from colonial to native, the ivory went on the world market. My work took me to HongKong after that time where I saw a ivory carvings something of an industry there but only suspect there might have been a connection.

My .44 Russian I bought in France for $18 at a used furniture store. I had ivory grips made for it but later used them on a .44 DA S&W with a bit of mod --


Lettered shipped to dealer in Paris in 1896 ---->
 
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