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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I got my little diamondback back from Colt today. They fixed the bolt screw (head) that broke off and reset the timing so it locks up perfectly. They did not state it, but it looks like they also changed the vee spring out when they worked on it.

So, why do I need advice?

Well the new Single action trigger pull is 7 lbs 2 onz. The lawyers up at Colt would be proud of this one. My old vee spring gave me about a 3 lb single action trigger pull.

I looked at the vee spring with the grips off and it has the conventional vee shape, but about 2/3rds the way up toward the hammer, there is a bend in the top arm of the spring so it has an extra v shape. I should have taken a picture, but basically as you cock the hammer (with the grips off) you can see the vee spring compresses smoothly then the extra bend in the top part of the vee spring hits the lower arm of the vee spring and then the pressure on the vee spring jumps up. At the last bit of lockup, or when you actually pull the trigger, you are only compressing about the last 1.5" of the upper arm of the spring as the bottom half of the spring is now fully compressed.


So, my question is. What to do?
1) I don't think Colt will change anything on it, but I will call them tomorrow about it.
2) I was thinking about just leaving it cocked and seeing if that would take some of the tension off.
3) I can just replace the vee spring with a Wolff spring (I think this is within my limited smithing abilities).
4) I vaguely remember reading that you can stick a rod in the vee point and bend the spring a bit to stop this problem (I really don't want to do this).
5) Or finally just live with it.

Your suggestions?

Thanks

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Have no idea what the tension is with a Wolff Spring,but I agree,this is way too high. I have "stuck a rod at the vee point" countless times,using around 1/8"-3/16" diameter,while cocking it S.A. Are you sure they did not "mess with the sear angle"? This seem quite a jump for just a spring,unless,as you implied,they are worried about lawsuits, Is the trigger pull still as crisp,no creep,as before? The only Colt model that I ever encountered with a heavier than normal mainspring,were the 1917 New Services,compared to the non military models. Some,probably an arsenal rework(?),had a heavier spring to better fire military primers. Bud
 

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Try the "rod in the V" method. I've used it numerous times and always had good results. It can be straightened again if necessary. Use the 1/8" first, then go up to the 3/16" if that doesn't feel right.
 

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Peter,
It is also possible that in re-timing it, the 'notch' or "second finger" on the hand is just a tad too generous. As you pull the trigger on a Colt, the hand rises and puts tension on the ratchet locking the cylinder firmly in place. If it is just the slightest bit too generous, it can make the trigger pull heavy. Jerry Kuhnhausen suggests just a 'bit' too much to allow for "seating" caused by firing. I suggest you not mess with the hand but try a session at the range with it and see if it doesn't improve. Another sign that it is the hand is if it is somewhat hard to cock on the last 1/16 of travel. The hammer is having difficulty trying to clear the sear on the trigger as by virtue of the hand/ratchet/bolt, the trigger has already travelled as far as it normally wants to. If after firing, it still is the same, I would recommend sending it back to Colt with an explanation of the problem. They will certainly know what to do and it will come back with the smoothest trigger you have ever seen. I trust this will help. CC
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I talked to Colt today and they said it was fine and within specs. They suggested I use it a bit and get back to them. They also considered my comments that they sent it back dirty and I would have liked it clean.

In the mean time I took the grips off again and really studied it. I then got out the trigger gauge and measured it a bunch. I finally decided that it was not "lubed" enough so I lubed it a bit. The trigger pull get measureably better. I then dry fired it a bit well actually a lot and the trigger got better still. Finally I dumped a LOT of oil in it and dry fired it a bunch more and it settled down to a so so 4 lb single action trigger pull. I can live with that and I will try it at the range next.

I guess I am pleased that Colt fixed the broken screw but I did not really like the experience. I am sort of thinking once I get comfortable with my little Diamondback being "ok" I will retire it to the safe and buy another to shoot.

My first one lasted me 25 years, if the next one lasts me another 25 years, I will either be dead or not really worried about it anymore.

Thanks for the advice. I will give you all a range report once I can get it out and shooting.

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